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  1. #1
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    How do inmates spot someone to manipulate

    What do inmates look for in a c/o or staff member when trying to spot someone who can be easily manipulated? Based on your experience from watching other c/o's become compromised.

  2. #2
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    I would say someoe who is too "chatty" with inmates.

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    JMTX
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    I think they look for a few things.

    1)People with self esteem issues, especially females. Every female I've seen fall prey has had low self esteem, and was usually either overweight or homely looking. That's not a dig towards overweight female officers (I am one) but some of them don't have high self esteem (they have yet to figure out that we chunky gals are sexxxxy beeotches!) Though other officers often keep a closer eye on young gals, everyone one I've personally known was older (mid 40s or so). Always single or in a bad relationship at home. They are people who are so desperate for attention that they actually take the compliments these inmates hurl at them seriously, which I'll never understand. When the inmates come onto me, I just think to myself: "Wow...you're looking at a 200lb woman in a man's uniform? You must be REALLY desperate. No thanks."

    2)People with financial problems. People who are hard up at home seem more likely to do things if they think they can earn some cash from it. I've had inmates give me this line: "Wouldn't you like to have someone in your life who has lots of money? Will pay your rent, your electric bill, buy you nice clothes, etc?" I tell them, "I already have somebody like that. I call her Mom, and she doesn't ask me to compromise myself. You might want to pitch your line to someone who isn't a spoiled mama's girl, cause I can assure you that I don't hurt for ANYTHING." It's probably more than I should say to them, but I like watching their jaw drop.

    3.) People with questionable ethics. They watch how you act. They watch how ethical you are. Do you make your rounds? Do you lie to supervision? Do you talk about your personal life with inmates? They'll try to gage how strictly you see the law. I let them know, in no uncertain terms, that I do NOT condone illegal activity. You know how they are. They'll say something like, "Well ya know, EVERYBODY has tried pot..." and see how you react. I tell them really quick, "Uh no, they don't. Some of us have ALWAYS had ethics, even as teenagers." "You mean you never tried pot?" "Absolutely not. I don't believe in illegal activity." They get the hint pretty quick.

    Anyway, that's just my opinion and the things I've seen the most.
    Last edited by JMTX; 11-23-2007 at 01:31 AM.

  4. #4
    JMTX
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    Quote Originally Posted by HeyBoss View Post
    I would say someoe who is too "chatty" with inmates.

    I think that one depends. SOMETIMES, it's a clue.

    But I also know officers with outstanding ethics who are "chatty." They never talk about anything personal though. They develop a "rapport" with the inmates by talking amongst them and often get good info from the inmates.

    If it's a 60yr old man walking around the dayroom, going from table to table and asking people how they're doing, what's new, etc, I won't automatically say that makes him an easy mark.

    But if it's a lonely looking female with one particular male inmate hanging on her desk all night, I'll start being curious.

    And before anyone gets their panties in a wad, yeah, I'm a girl, and yeah I think women in general are easier targets. Mostly because so many of them are suckers for a good looking man with a line of bullcrap.

  5. #5
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    The statistics within TDCJ are that it is not new boots but veterans with around 9 years that get compromised the most, complacency I think is the killer for C.O.'s.

    All the issues that JMTX stated are fact, but lately the ones getting busted are not the ones that we would have ever suspected.
    the only true rehabilitation starts with a needle............

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    Quote Originally Posted by TX_CO View Post

    All the issues that JMTX stated are fact, but lately the ones getting busted are not the ones that we would have ever suspected.
    I have to agree to this, the ones you least expect it are the ones who would try and do something for these inmates.

    I would also say that Male officers in a male prison are more likely be able to chat with the inmates more then the female officers.

  7. #7
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    i talk with them all the time, but not about personal stuff, or I'll turn their questions back on them "I'm doing fine, but how are YOU doing?" my I/M's love to talk about themselves.

    I've had one serious offer to bring in contraband and after I served him a DR and he got back from the hole, word got around, that I'm a fair CO, but I take that stuff serious to the letter.

    One thing I noticed before I went to the academy is a CO who talked about inappropriate stuff with I/M's, and crossed the professional line with them, and now that particular C/O is no longer employed with the DOC, so I guess my thoughts were dead on.
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  8. #8
    JMTX
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    I would also say that Male officers in a male prison are more likely be able to chat with the inmates more then the female officers.
    Could you clarify that?

    Are you saying male officers are more LIKELY to chat or that because of your policies male officers are more likely to be in contact with the male inmates?

    I know that when I was at state jail, they really avoided letting female officers work in direct contact with the men (we were always in pickets, medical,etc) but at the county jail females run direct I/M supervision pods just as often as men do.

    Right now, our shift (at our facility) has 61 male officers and 50 females (not counting rank). We only have two floors that house females. One floor has 4 officers on it, the other has 6, meaning there are only 10 of those 50 female officers who are working with female inmates on any given day. The other 40 are working with men.

  9. #9
    JMTX
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    Quote Originally Posted by TX_CO View Post
    The statistics within TDCJ are that it is not new boots but veterans with around 9 years that get compromised the most, complacency I think is the killer for C.O.'s.

    All the issues that JMTX stated are fact, but lately the ones getting busted are not the ones that we would have ever suspected.
    I could count on my fingers the number of people out of our 111 on shift that have 9yrs plus, lol! But then, we might have much higher turn over than you do. On our shift, if you've got 3 or 4yrs in, you're ahead of most people. I've got 4.5yrs in and I'm sitting somewhere around #30 on the seniority list, if I recall correctly. Actually it may be higher now, haven't looked in a while.

    Of all the ones I've known of since I've been here, only one of them was someone I didn't expect (and he was a supervisor). But then again, those are just the ones I know about. I'm sure there have been lots of others that were kept a bit more hush-hush.

  10. #10
    WannaBeSheriff
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    Although I havent read this book, I've heard good things about


    Games Criminals Play: How You Can Profit by Knowing Them.

    (amazon link)

    http://www.amazon.com/Games-Criminal..._sim_b_title_1

  11. #11
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    I am actually reading a book called The Art of the Con....Avoiding offender manipulation......by Gary Cornelius I purchased this off Amazon also..
    Its a very good read, I am learning everthing I can prior to hopefully getting the call for corrections.....I have read several books including The Big House, Behind Prison Walls, Newjack etc. I figure you can never be prepared enough, the more I read the better off I will be...

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    I have no idea what an I/M looks for, but personally I watch for officers who are a little too eager to retrieve something for the stripes as soon as they ask all the time, and are willing to have a sit down in a pod one on one with an I/M to "talk." There are a few guys at my facility who are watching an officer who are following ALL of these points posted above to the letter!
    LOCKDOWN!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JMTX View Post
    Could you clarify that?

    Are you saying male officers are more LIKELY to chat or that because of your policies male officers are more likely to be in contact with the male inmates?

    I know that when I was at state jail, they really avoided letting female officers work in direct contact with the men (we were always in pickets, medical,etc) but at the county jail females run direct I/M supervision pods just as often as men do.

    Right now, our shift (at our facility) has 61 male officers and 50 females (not counting rank). We only have two floors that house females. One floor has 4 officers on it, the other has 6, meaning there are only 10 of those 50 female officers who are working with female inmates on any given day. The other 40 are working with men.
    JMTX,

    I mean in my prison I can get away with talking to an e-mail more then 5 mins. Now a female officer can't go and talk to an inmate for more then 5 mins, if she does everyone thinks there is something going on between the said inmate and the officer. I don't think I would ever work in a female prison, I think those guys who do up for SAINT HOOD.

  14. #14
    JMTX
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    See almost all of our pods are direct inmate supervision, so the officer would have to talk to them for 5min or more. She's the only officer in there all night, 72 to 1. She's expected to do her job, which included talking to them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maxine View Post
    I am actually reading a book called The Art of the Con....Avoiding offender manipulation......by Gary Cornelius I purchased this off Amazon also..
    Its a very good read, I am learning everthing I can prior to hopefully getting the call for corrections.....I have read several books including The Big House, Behind Prison Walls, Newjack etc. I figure you can never be prepared enough, the more I read the better off I will be...
    Those are decent books and but above all is to use your common sense. Never agree to a "favor" even if it is the most minor thing, never never agree to a "favor"! If you show fear they will pick that up and start the vice on you. Do your job like you just started every day, be alert, trust no inmate, and be fair and consistent in your work.

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    Thanks for the info Stewie....I have a lot of common sense, and plenty to go around..LOL...I will probably unnerve them(IM) because I always walk around with a smile on my face, and I am sure they will wonder what is up my sleeve...regular people wonder that....I'm not the type to get scared or nervous so I won't let them get to me that way, I love to try to figure things out so I can't wait to be able to do that....I'm a people watcher....I know that is a great part of corrections, observing and noticing slight differences in the inmates....
    NYS better have me on there list to call.......

  17. #17
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    The thugs look for people who are unable to say "No" and mean it.
    "Keep up the good fight, pass the word, and teach others to fight back when unjustly assaulted--be it on the street or in the courtroom. Self-defense is a normal, moral act. So teach your family, friends, and students practical defense against both physical and legal marauders." by Jerry VanCook www.PrisonOfficer.Org

  18. #18
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    Old Vets. The ones that have turned scared now they they have a little grey in their hair. Some of the veterans at our department are pathetic. I have seen a couple let inmates use their cell phones. Most just give the house away. Retire already!!
    Noise Check!

    Vic Mackey was my Training Officer

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRIME EVIL View Post
    Old Vets. The ones that have turned scared now they they have a little grey in their hair. Some of the veterans at our department are pathetic. I have seen a couple let inmates use their cell phones. Most just give the house away. Retire already!!
    Funny you say that. I have a $100 that says the average length of service of a manipulated staff member is 10+ years. Everyone always points fingers at the brand new guys, but in reality it's the officer that has been around for a while and has become "familiar" with the inmates that is the easy mark.

    Just my 2 cents though.

  20. #20
    JMTX
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    I can only speak for the ones I've personally known , but I don't think any of them had more than 5yrs, and most more like 2yrs.

    But then our turn-over is really high here, and we don't have many people with 10yrs plus period. Maybe 10 of them out of the 111 on shift? Just a random guess, don't have the numbers in front of me at the moment.

  21. #21
    Relief Is Here!
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    When your dealing with the same group of inmates all day everyday..It's easy to get complacent. I have a bid on a floor and I swap with my 7-3 counterpart, so I'm on the same housing unit for 16 straight hours..
    If we unite and fight..we can win the day..Save Ogdensburgh or your facility may be next..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bass View Post
    I have no idea what an I/M looks for, but personally I watch for officers who are a little too eager to retrieve something for the stripes as soon as they ask all the time, and are willing to have a sit down in a pod one on one with an I/M to "talk." There are a few guys at my facility who are watching an officer who are following ALL of these points posted above to the letter!
    Excellent point.

    Communication is important. But, "talking" is a sign of something more than communicating to a thug what is expected of him. It's a symptom of emotional involvement.
    Last edited by hankrearden2000; 11-27-2007 at 10:31 PM. Reason: Addition
    "Keep up the good fight, pass the word, and teach others to fight back when unjustly assaulted--be it on the street or in the courtroom. Self-defense is a normal, moral act. So teach your family, friends, and students practical defense against both physical and legal marauders." by Jerry VanCook www.PrisonOfficer.Org

  23. #23
    SHU
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    jk

    Quote Originally Posted by hankrearden2000 View Post
    The thugs look for people who are unable to say "No" and mean it.

    That says it all. You have to look them in the eye and say what you mean and mean what you say in this line of work. If you can't do it, the I/Ms will pick up on it and you will be a mark. When you are new the word "NO" should be the most common word that you use all day long. After they know you, you won't even have to say it because they will know to not even bother asking you any BS.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SHU View Post
    That says it all. You have to look them in the eye and say what you mean and mean what you say in this line of work. If you can't do it, the I/Ms will pick up on it and you will be a mark. When you are new the word "NO" should be the most common word that you use all day long. After they know you, you won't even have to say it because they will know to not even bother asking you any BS.
    It's so easy to say, one syllable, two letters, N-O, "No". Rolls right off the tongue and it's my favorite word at work. I even have it on my screen saver at work.

  25. #25
    JMTX
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    Ditto!

    "No" is a great word to use

    And if they keep asking, I just keep saying "no", in exactly the same tone of voice and volume as before. After a few monotone "no" replies, they usually give up pestering

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