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  1. #1
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    Good abbreviations to use on tickets?

    With the explanation area as small as it is, many here resort to abbreviations on the ticket. Anyone have a good abbreviation for a confrontational, adversarial contact? Today I used RPOW, Real Piece of Work - just doesn't flow for me.
    Suggestions?

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    AH = Aggressive and Hostile.

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    Quote Originally Posted by L-1 View Post
    AH = Aggressive and Hostile.
    Yeah....Aggresive and Hostile...thats what it means

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    We have the 4th copy to write notes on. This way no one else views it.

    I keep them in a small recipe file box in my locker. So when I go to court, I look at the "notes" to refresh my memory. It has spaces for driver comments, diagrams, weather etc.

    I would hesitate to write "personal" comments on the original ticket. Just my 2 cents.
    This profession is not for people looking for positive reinforcement from the public. Very often it can be a thankless job and you can't desire accolades, because those are not usually forthcoming. Just do your job to the best of your ability and live with the decisions you've made.

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    Quote Originally Posted by deputy x 2 View Post
    We have the 4th copy to write notes on. This way no one else views it.
    Don't you have to give them up when a violator files an informal dfiscovery request?

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    The pink copy of a citation in Florida is the officer's. I keep all of mine for reference in the event one goes to traffic court. Like deputy x 2, I write any personal notes on my copy so they don't end up as part of the public record.

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    Quote Originally Posted by L-1 View Post
    Don't you have to give them up when a violator files an informal dfiscovery request?
    On a traffic cite? Usually, when I show up for court...it's over! Citizens often hope traffic court falls on your day off and you won't show up. hee hee Minimum 4 hours of OT!

    Going back to the cite, if I wrote you, you deserved it...cuz I don't sweat the small stuff....ie hollywood stops etc

    and if you have the audacity to take me to court..you bet, I'll be there!
    This profession is not for people looking for positive reinforcement from the public. Very often it can be a thankless job and you can't desire accolades, because those are not usually forthcoming. Just do your job to the best of your ability and live with the decisions you've made.

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    Write in Bold

    Quote Originally Posted by rcs442 View Post
    With the explanation area as small as it is, many here resort to abbreviations on the ticket. Anyone have a good abbreviation for a confrontational, adversarial contact? Today I used RPOW, Real Piece of Work - just doesn't flow for me.
    Suggestions?

    My copy of the summons? I write the word ******* hopefully so the judge can see it. It is afterall my copy.
    "Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. The MARINES don't have that problem." ....Ronald Reagan

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    Quote Originally Posted by deputy x 2 View Post
    On a traffic cite?
    Before I retired I was responsible for handling all the discovery requests, Pitchess motions, etc., that came into the station. If they asked for the officer's notes on a traffic cite, we had 10 days in which to give them up. I usually had to track down the officer, make a copy of his copy of the cite (containing his notes) and send it off to the violator along with whatever else he requested and was entitled to.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Taylor1430 View Post
    Yeah....Aggresive and Hostile...thats what it means
    It's like this:

    A motorcycle officer stops a man for running a red light. The guy is a real jerk and comes running back to the motor officer. The violator demands to know why he is being harassed by the Gestapo! So the officer calmly tells him of the red light violation. The "Motorist" instantly goes on a tirade, questioning the officer's ancestry, sexual orientation, etc., in rather explicit terms. The officer, being a professional, takes it all in stride, figuring "battleship mouth and rowboat ***".

    The tirade goes on without the cop saying anything. When he gets done with writing the citation he puts an "AH" in the lower right corner of the narrative portion of the citation. He then hands it to the "Violator" for his signature.

    The guy signs the cite angrily, tearing the paper, and when presented his copy points to the "AH" and demands to know what it stands for. The officer then removes his mirrored sunglasses, gets in the middle of the guy's face and said, "That's so when we go to court, I'll remember you're an a**h***!"

    Three months later they are in court. The "Violator" has such a bad record he is about to lose his license and has hired an attorney to represent him.
    On the stand the officer testifies to seeing the man run the red light.
    Under cross-examination, the defense attorney asks, "Officer, is this a reasonable facsimile of the citation you issued my client?"

    Officer responds, "Yes sir, this is the defendant's copy, his signature and mine, same number at the top."

    Attorney: "Officer, is there any particular marking or notation on this citation you don't normally make?"

    Officer: "Yes sir, in the lower right corner of the narrative there is an 'AH', underlined."

    Attorney: "What does the AH stand for, officer?"

    Officer? "Aggressive and Hostile, Sir."

    Attorney: "Aggressive and hostile?"

    Officer: "Yes, Sir?"

    Attorney: "Officer, are you sure it doesn't stand for A**h***?"

    Officer: "Well, Sir, you know your client better than I do!"

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    Quote Originally Posted by L-1 View Post
    Before I retired I was responsible for handling all the discovery requests, Pitchess motions, etc., that came into the station. If they asked for the officer's notes on a traffic cite, we had 10 days in which to give them up. I usually had to track down the officer, make a copy of his copy of the cite (containing his notes) and send it off to the violator along with whatever else he requested and was entitled to.
    Most don't keep the 4th copy...some do. Hasn't happened to me yet. But nevertheless, I don't write anything inappropriate.

    Has anyone thought of making a discovery motion on the officer's hand? just kiddin

    Enjoy retired life!
    This profession is not for people looking for positive reinforcement from the public. Very often it can be a thankless job and you can't desire accolades, because those are not usually forthcoming. Just do your job to the best of your ability and live with the decisions you've made.

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    Quote Originally Posted by deputy x 2 View Post
    Most don't keep the 4th copy...some do. Hasn't happened to me yet. But nevertheless, I don't write anything inappropriate.

    Has anyone thought of making a discovery motion on the officer's hand? just kiddin

    Enjoy retired life!
    The things they would ask for in informal discovery were really amusing. They would want radar and speedometer calibration records, patrol car repair records, training certificates, radar manufacturer's repair manuals, copies of enforcement procedures, training manuals, academy instructor's teaching outlines, speed surveys, etc. We were not the custodian of records for a lot of those things and many others were exempt from public disclosure. But in the end, many would come into the station to pick up a pile of documents and I would ask, "Now that you have these items, what are you going to do with them?" Everyone gave the same answer, "I don't know."

  13. #13
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    There is always, this notation: (*)...just center the star within those arcs!
    "Many times, I have thoughts and feelings which can only be expressed through dance!" - Bender, Futurama

    "Ranking right up there with 'No good deed goes unpunished' are:

    'Sooner or later, we just might outlive our usefulness to others' and...

    'Sometimes it's very possible to push the most loving and loyal person, beyond the point where they no longer give a 5h!t'"
    - Yours truly

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    Quote Originally Posted by L-1 View Post
    It's like this:


    The guy signs the cite angrily, tearing the paper, and when presented his copy points to the "AH" and demands to know what it stands for. The officer then removes his mirrored sunglasses, gets in the middle of the guy's face and said, "That's so when we go to court, I'll remember you're an a**h***!"

    Officer responds, "Yes sir, this is the defendant's copy, his signature and mine, same number at the top."

    Attorney: "Officer, is there any particular marking or notation on this citation you don't normally make?"

    Officer: "Yes sir, in the lower right corner of the narrative there is an 'AH', underlined."

    Attorney: "What does the AH stand for, officer?"

    Officer? "Aggressive and Hostile, Sir."

    Attorney: "Aggressive and hostile?"

    Officer: "Yes, Sir?"

    Attorney: "Officer, are you sure it doesn't stand for A**h***?"

    Officer: "Well, Sir, you know your client better than I do!"
    Thats why I found it funny. I had never heard of Aggressive and Hostile but am all too familiar with an Adam Henry. Now I really CAN put it on my cites

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    Quote Originally Posted by Taylor1430 View Post
    Thats why I found it funny. I had never heard of Aggressive and Hostile but am all too familiar with an Adam Henry. Now I really CAN put it on my cites
    Glad I could be of help.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kieth M. View Post
    There is always, this notation: (*)...just center the star within those arcs!
    I like it!

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    That's a good one, I have to remember that one myself.

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    Make notes on the officers copy DO NOT READ FROM IT IN COURT, it then becomes public record and available for all to see. Keep track of court dates and if you have to appear, check the notes prior to testfying and leave them out of the courtroom, develop a code for personal use to jog your memory, use that instead. Stay Safe

    Usually if I write someone a CITATION (tickets are sold for the Policeman's Ball) they have been Agressively Hostile.

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    we actually have boxes we can check to determine whether or not the guy was cool or a jerk. The AH box is marked "J" and the other one is marked "Code"

    I don't know why they chose those terms, but it works

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    The only code I need is "MVR," for Mobile Video Recorder. Let the Agressive Hostiles speak for themselves.

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    Many years ago we used to write a circle with a dot in the middle (indicating a-hole). Many judges knew what it meant.

    Nowadays it is something us old timers (lol) refer to as a circle-dot whe someone is being a jerk. No more ticket notations. Judges don't really care for code-words etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by patroldog View Post
    Usually if I write someone a CITATION (tickets are sold for the Policeman's Ball) they have been Agressively Hostile.
    Of course, you know this just begs for the response "Policemen don't have balls around here."

    Thanks all for the suggestions!

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    Talking Ah

    Originally Posted by L-1
    It's like this:


    The guy signs the cite angrily, tearing the paper, and when presented his copy points to the "AH" and demands to know what it stands for. The officer then removes his mirrored sunglasses, gets in the middle of the guy's face and said, "That's so when we go to court, I'll remember you're an a**h***!"

    Officer responds, "Yes sir, this is the defendant's copy, his signature and mine, same number at the top."

    Attorney: "Officer, is there any particular marking or notation on this citation you don't normally make?"

    Officer: "Yes sir, in the lower right corner of the narrative there is an 'AH', underlined."

    Attorney: "What does the AH stand for, officer?"

    Officer? "Aggressive and Hostile, Sir."

    Attorney: "Aggressive and hostile?"

    Officer: "Yes, Sir?"

    Attorney: "Officer, are you sure it doesn't stand for A**h***?"

    Officer: "Well, Sir, you know your client better than I do!"


    This is Probably the funniest thing I have seen in this career yet. I am going to keep this abriviation in mind.
    -King

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    AH goes either way for us at my old department. For "Correct" reasons it ment Angry Hostile, for ours it ment A****le. Over the radio if we had someone that was AH we used "Adam-Henery" it pretty much ment step it up and get here, situation can go either way.

    If you are on scene and people are yelling at you and you are waiting for backup or something. You just say "Be advised, subjects are Adam-Henery." Gave eveyone else a heads up of what they were in store for.

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    Thumbs up Ah

    That is a very good way letting other officers know the situation they are getting into, by advising them that the suspects/subjects are "Adam-Henry". Thank you for this helpful tip. I will deffintley remember this when I face Angry-Hostile individuals.
    -King

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