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    Special Police

    I was wondering if any of you can tell me about the process of becoming a 'special police officer'. I know their general guidelines and generally about who uses them / what for etc. But the process is what I'm interested in. Ive seen a few places that have SPOs, who for all intents and purposes appear to be full LEOs, have been to a local academy, etc. Then I've seen some that dont carry firearms (company/school policy?), and I dont think have attended an academy. I'm just wondering how the system works - or if all have to attend a MD academy. I see in a previous thread that they are not entitled to enforce MV law, but if they go to an academy that teaches it, they can. So assuming this is the whole story, some dont attend the whole sha-bang.

    Another thing is, a local college near me was recently hiring 'Public Safety Officer's', but down the bottom stated 'must meet all the qualifications necessary or required to become a Maryland Special Police Officer' - or something to that effect. But nothing else. So no PT requirements, no mention of training, etc. Just wondering how this all fits together.

    As always, I appreciate the help.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MisterSU View Post
    I was wondering if any of you can tell me about the process of becoming a 'special police officer'. I know their general guidelines and generally about who uses them / what for etc. But the process is what I'm interested in. Ive seen a few places that have SPOs, who for all intents and purposes appear to be full LEOs, have been to a local academy, etc. Then I've seen some that dont carry firearms (company/school policy?), and I dont think have attended an academy. I'm just wondering how the system works - or if all have to attend a MD academy. I see in a previous thread that they are not entitled to enforce MV law, but if they go to an academy that teaches it, they can. So assuming this is the whole story, some dont attend the whole sha-bang.

    Another thing is, a local college near me was recently hiring 'Public Safety Officer's', but down the bottom stated 'must meet all the qualifications necessary or required to become a Maryland Special Police Officer' - or something to that effect. But nothing else. So no PT requirements, no mention of training, etc. Just wondering how this all fits together.

    As always, I appreciate the help.
    As far as i know in Maryland you dont have to go to a full academy to become an SPO. There is only one college that requires it that I know of and thats PGCC. Thats mostly because they want MPCTC certified officers but the can only have SPO status. SPO differs from state to state. Just because you are an SPO dosnt mean that you have to be armed. It would be nice though. As you may aleady know. SPO's have all the authority of a police officer on property owned ONLY and may only go beyond those limits if it is the case a fresh pursuit. ( the person committed the crime on the property and attempted to flee) Its pretty easy to get an SPO license in Maryland honestly. I am not sure if you get sworn in to be an SPO. I know in D.C. you do. basically you just have to have a clean record. I think they just run your name through NCIC or i could be wrong.
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    SPO's have all the authority of a police officer on property owned ONLY and may only go beyond those limits if it is the case a fresh pursuit.
    Also property that is leased, and used by the agency that the SPO licensed is issued. As for "pursuits" you have to have attended and graduated a basic police trainng course (the academy). Then you can run laser and write MV infractions on roads adjacent to the property.

    Its pretty easy to get an SPO license in Maryland honestly. I am not sure if you get sworn in to be an SPO.
    To become an SPO, you fill out the same MSP licensing packet that security guards and PI's fill out. You have to get your fingerprints done, etc. After your background is completed they will notify you to go get sworn in at a court house. SPO's are basically security guards with arrest authority. Excluding those agencies that have sent their personnel through an academy.
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    thanks for the clear up

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    Quote Originally Posted by DPS55 View Post
    thanks for the clear up
    Not many SPO's in Maryland are actually certified through the MPTC. The ones that are certified, their authority still only allows them to operate at their place of employment. No powers off-duty, etc. Even if an incient occurs where they work and it steps off of the property, then must notify the local LE. They are not allowed to pursue, etc.
    "An excuse is worse and more terrible than a lie, for an excuse is a lie guarded."

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    Quote Originally Posted by DPS55 View Post
    thanks for the clear up
    No problem!
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    So do all SPO's have to be sworn in Maryland?
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    Quote Originally Posted by DPS55 View Post
    So do all SPO's have to be sworn in Maryland?
    No. SPO's are not Sworn Law Enforcement Officers. They are Special Police Officers. They status/authority is given to them by the Governor and their Employer. They do not have any authority off of work or from the property in which they work at. Same as certain colleges, such as Howard U. in D.C. They are Special Police officers, not Sworn LEO's.
    "An excuse is worse and more terrible than a lie, for an excuse is a lie guarded."

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    Quote Originally Posted by irishlad2nv View Post
    No. SPO's are not Sworn Law Enforcement Officers. They are Special Police Officers. They status/authority is given to them by the Governor and their Employer. They do not have any authority off of work or from the property in which they work at. Same as certain colleges, such as Howard U. in D.C. They are Special Police officers, not Sworn LEO's.
    I would like to crituque that. SPO's at ALL University's or College's in in D.C. are in fact sworn in after they complete there training. INCLUDING Howard University.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DPS55 View Post
    I would like to crituque that. SPO's at ALL University's or College's in in D.C. are in fact sworn in after they complete there training. INCLUDING Howard University.
    Special Police in D.C are not Sworn Police Officers, since they are not Police Officers. Since you are going to be working at Howard...here'ssome insight for you.

    . The term "special police officer," is any person who is commissioned pursuant to the provisions of D.C. Code, ┬ž 4-114 (1981) and other regulations which have been approved pursuant to this act, and who may be authorized to carry a weapon.

    D. Special Police Officers.

    1. Special police officers are privately commissioned police officers with full arrest powers within an area or premises which the officer has been employed to protect. The commission is conditional and is required to be renewed each year.

    2. Special police officers may be appointed by the Mayor for duty in connection with the property of or under the charge of a corporation or individual requesting the appointment. Special police officers shall be strictly confined in their authority to the particular place or property which they are commissioned to protect.

    3. Commissions issued to special police officers shall specify the following:

    a. The particular place or property they are commissioned to protect (this information is normally kept in the form of a contract list which is available for inspection at the Security Officers Manage┬*ment Branch);

    b. Any waiver of the uniform requirement;

    c. Firearm authorization status; and

    d. In the case of DCMR Title 6-A, Chapter 11, Section 1101.2, any requirement for storage or special provisions for transportation of firearms or other dangerous weapons.

    4. Special police officers are normally in uniform as required by DCMR Title 6-A, Chapter 11, Section 1109, however, upon request a uniform waiver may be granted.

    5. Special police officers may be authorized to bear firearms, however, they must meet additional requirements which includes completing an annual firearms training course.

    6. The holder of a special police officer's commission is not authorized to take police action on public space, except when in fresh pursuit from an authorized location. The holder of a special police officer's commission may not take police action on private property, unless their employing agency has contracted with the owner of the private property to render security related services. Violations may result in the revocation of both the agency's license and special police officer's commission.

    7. Special police officers are explicitly prohibited from engaging in roving patrols on public space. However, officers may travel upon public space to get from one job site to another and the most direct route must be taken. Any deviations of armed special police officers traveling between job sites may subject the officer to arrest for firearms violations and the revocation of their commission.

    8. No person shall be appointed as a special police officer pursuant to D.C. Code ┬ž4- 114, and DCMR Title 6-A, Chapter 11, unless they meet the following require┬*ments:

    a. Have reached the age of twenty-one (21) years;
    b. Be a citizen of the United States;
    c. Be of good moral character;
    d. Be approved for appointment by the Chief of Police
    "An excuse is worse and more terrible than a lie, for an excuse is a lie guarded."

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    Quote Originally Posted by DPS55 View Post
    So do all SPO's have to be sworn in Maryland?
    Yes, they are "sworn" in. When you recieve your letter from the licensing division of MSP, it will state that you have X amount of time to go to the court house to be sworn in as a SPO. Once you are sworn in proof of swearing in must be sent to the licensing division. You're taking the "oath of office" and swearing that you won't abuse it.

    The SPO laws of Maryland are very confusing when you read it. However, in my understanding they're basiclly security officers with arrest authority.
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishlad2nv View Post
    Special Police in D.C are not Sworn Police Officers, since they are not Police Officers. Since you are going to be working at Howard...here'ssome insight for you.

    . The term "special police officer," is any person who is commissioned pursuant to the provisions of D.C. Code, ┬ž 4-114 (1981) and other regulations which have been approved pursuant to this act, and who may be authorized to carry a weapon.

    D. Special Police Officers.

    1. Special police officers are privately commissioned police officers with full arrest powers within an area or premises which the officer has been employed to protect. The commission is conditional and is required to be renewed each year.

    2. Special police officers may be appointed by the Mayor for duty in connection with the property of or under the charge of a corporation or individual requesting the appointment. Special police officers shall be strictly confined in their authority to the particular place or property which they are commissioned to protect.

    3. Commissions issued to special police officers shall specify the following:

    a. The particular place or property they are commissioned to protect (this information is normally kept in the form of a contract list which is available for inspection at the Security Officers Manageªment Branch);

    b. Any waiver of the uniform requirement;

    c. Firearm authorization status; and

    d. In the case of DCMR Title 6-A, Chapter 11, Section 1101.2, any requirement for storage or special provisions for transportation of firearms or other dangerous weapons.

    4. Special police officers are normally in uniform as required by DCMR Title 6-A, Chapter 11, Section 1109, however, upon request a uniform waiver may be granted.

    5. Special police officers may be authorized to bear firearms, however, they must meet additional requirements which includes completing an annual firearms training course.

    6. The holder of a special police officer's commission is not authorized to take police action on public space, except when in fresh pursuit from an authorized location. The holder of a special police officer's commission may not take police action on private property, unless their employing agency has contracted with the owner of the private property to render security related services. Violations may result in the revocation of both the agency's license and special police officer's commission.

    7. Special police officers are explicitly prohibited from engaging in roving patrols on public space. However, officers may travel upon public space to get from one job site to another and the most direct route must be taken. Any deviations of armed special police officers traveling between job sites may subject the officer to arrest for firearms violations and the revocation of their commission.

    8. No person shall be appointed as a special police officer pursuant to D.C. Code ┬ž4- 114, and DCMR Title 6-A, Chapter 11, unless they meet the following require┬¬ments:

    a. Have reached the age of twenty-one (21) years;
    b. Be a citizen of the United States;
    c. Be of good moral character;
    d. Be approved for appointment by the Chief of Police
    All college and University SPO's go through the same police academy which is the University Consortium which is prescribed by the Security Officer's Management Branch of the District of Columbia.Your statement applies to SPO's that are appointed to that position that work for a private company. Not a University or college. (Yes I know that Howard is a private University) I know my staus when i finish the academy. Thanks
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    Quote Originally Posted by DPS55 View Post
    All college and University SPO's go through the same police academy which is the University Consortium which is prescribed by the Security Officer's Management Branch of the District of Columbia.Your statement applies to SPO's that are appointed to that position that work for a private company. Not a University or college. (Yes I know that Howard is a private University) I know my staus when i finish the academy. Thanks
    Confused as to why you made your statement earlier on about SPO's in DC being Sworn? One thing you will have to understand is you won't be a Police Officer. Meaning, you have no authority off-duty, can't carry your duty weapon off-duty..(Howard use to or still turns in their weapon daily). SPO's gnerally are not looked upon as "Police" and in DC, their is no regulated training requirements for SPO's or Security Guards.
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishlad2nv View Post
    Confused as to why you made your statement earlier on about SPO's in DC being Sworn? One thing you will have to understand is you won't be a Police Officer. Meaning, you have no authority off-duty, can't carry your duty weapon off-duty..(Howard use to or still turns in their weapon daily). SPO's gnerally are not looked upon as "Police" and in DC, their is no regulated training requirements for SPO's or Security Guards.
    actually.. thats change(d) or is still in the works. ALL security/spos in DC are mandated to attend training. Not sure on the specifics.. but some kind of training is now mandatory.
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishlad2nv View Post
    Confused as to why you made your statement earlier on about SPO's in DC being Sworn? One thing you will have to understand is you won't be a Police Officer. Meaning, you have no authority off-duty, can't carry your duty weapon off-duty..(Howard use to or still turns in their weapon daily). SPO's gnerally are not looked upon as "Police" and in DC, their is no regulated training requirements for SPO's or Security Guards.
    For Universitys and Colleges there are requirements that must be met. I know what my department heads told me. I guess the only way to make you beleive is to have you talk to someone. Contract companys No. Universitys and colleges Yes. For example CALEA only gives SWORN law enforcement agencys accredidation. George Washington University is in fact currently accreditted by CALEA and Howard is working towards that goal as well. All college and University SPO's go through the University Consortium Police Academy as prescribed by the Security Officer's Management Branch of the District of Columbia. We are basically sworn to uphold the rules and regulations of the University. The jurisdiction of course is the prperty owned as well as the streets adjacent to the property owned.
    Last edited by DPS55; 05-15-2007 at 08:55 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BadBoynMD View Post
    actually.. thats change(d) or is still in the works. ALL security/spos in DC are mandated to attend training. Not sure on the specifics.. but some kind of training is now mandatory.
    Thanks alot Badboy. Maybe Irishlad hasnt been updated.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DPS55 View Post
    Thanks alot Badboy. Maybe Irishlad hasnt been updated.
    There has always been some training that either SPO's or Guards go through, however it was never mandated. Now it is, or should be. This does not mean they get the same training as a Police Officer will go through. In order for any agency to get their CALEA, is they would actually have to be a Police Agency, not "Special Police". I realize that your goal has probably been to get into LE, but being a SPO, will not exactly count as LE experience. Yes you do similar jobs as some police agencies, however, their is no real formal training required, no mandatd in-depth background checks. All is required is a simple FBI fingerprint background.

    Although you wil lbe attending some type of "academy". It is not a Police Academt that will allow you to transfer to another agency, such as Maryland or Virginia.
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishlad2nv View Post
    There has always been some training that either SPO's or Guards go through, however it was never mandated. Now it is, or should be. This does not mean they get the same training as a Police Officer will go through. In order for any agency to get their CALEA, is they would actually have to be a Police Agency, not "Special Police". I realize that your goal has probably been to get into LE, but being a SPO, will not exactly count as LE experience. Yes you do similar jobs as some police agencies, however, their is no real formal training required, no mandatd in-depth background checks. All is required is a simple FBI fingerprint background.

    Although you wil lbe attending some type of "academy". It is not a Police Academt that will allow you to transfer to another agency, such as Maryland or Virginia.
    George Washington University has SWORN SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS and they are accredited through CALEA. Do a search. I know my staus when i become a Special Police Officer. I know that I cant lateral over to any other departments. I dont care about lateraling over to any other departments.My debate is that All college and university SPO's in D.C. are sworn when they complete the academy. It honestly sounds to me like you are trying to bad mouth the fact that i am going to be an SPO. Working at Howard is my cup of tea. I like the benifit of working on college campus's because of the free education. I dont understand why you think a department would lie about being sworn.
    Last edited by DPS55; 05-15-2007 at 12:11 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishlad2nv View Post
    There has always been some training that either SPO's or Guards go through, however it was never mandated. Now it is, or should be. This does not mean they get the same training as a Police Officer will go through. In order for any agency to get their CALEA, is they would actually have to be a Police Agency, not "Special Police". I realize that your goal has probably been to get into LE, but being a SPO, will not exactly count as LE experience. Yes you do similar jobs as some police agencies, however, their is no real formal training required, no mandatd in-depth background checks. All is required is a simple FBI fingerprint background.

    Although you wil lbe attending some type of "academy". It is not a Police Academt that will allow you to transfer to another agency, such as Maryland or Virginia.
    As a matter of fact I found it. They are accreditted because they are a sworn law enforcement agency.

    March 2006

    GW POLICE DEPARTMENT RECEIVES CERTIFICATION FROM CALEA

    The George Washington University Police Department joins an elite group of accredited agences that makes up less than 1 percent of college/university police departments worldwide.

    WASHINGTON - The George Washington University Police Department (UPD) announced today that it has received accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA), becoming one of a selected few college and university police departments in the country formally recognized by the association.

    "Due to the selectivity of receiving CALEA accreditation, the University Police Department will be recognized as an elite force among university police departments nationwide," said University Police Chief Dolores Stafford. "We exhaustively revised our procedures - from training to response to investigation follow-up. This process has enhanced an already responsive department."

    GW's University Police Department underwent a rigorous process to receive accreditation. The five phase process began with an application to CALEA four years ago and culminated with full accredited status. During the approval process UPD submitted proof of compliance with each of the 450 standards set by CALEA, went through several on-site assessments and inspections, and attended a public hearing at which CALEA heard testimony from agency personnel, assessors, staff, and members of the community.

    CALEA accreditation will allow GW to recruit and retain top officers, further improving the caliber of the department. UPD also sought to formalize and strengthen management practices and solidify inter-agency cooperation and coordination. The University Police Department joins less than 1 percent of campus police departments nationwide that have been awarded this level of recognition. In the District of Columbia, only the Amtrak Police Department, Metro Transit Police, and the United States Capitol Police share this distinction. D.C.'s Metropolitan Police Department and Georgetown University Public Safety Department are currently in the self-assessment process of seeking accreditation.

    The GW University Police Department protects and serves the University community by providing professional law enforcement services and actively promoting community involvement through progressive community policing strategies and a commitment to education. UPD employs more than 150 full-time personnel of which more than 100 are uniformed officers, all of whom have attended an initial training series of 700 hours, including a 250 hour campus law enforcement training academy. UPD also offers several community public safety programs, such as free self-defense courses for all female members of the GW community.

    For further information and the full news release, visit the GW News Center at http://www.gwu.edu/~media/pressrelease.cfm?ann_id=21371. Check out the Pictures in the Photo Gallery of University Police representatives, Accreditation Manager Mark Balazik, Chief Dolores A. Stafford, and Captain Frank Demes, accept the award on behalf of the entire Department.
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    Not even attempting to "bad-mouth". Theres a very distinct difference between a Sworn Law Enforcement Officer and a Special Police Officer. Being a "sworn SPO" is not being a "sworn Police Officer". That's very important not to get confused.

    Yes I know GW is CALEA accredited. They are 1 of very few colleges that actually are.
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishlad2nv View Post
    There has always been some training that either SPO's or Guards go through, however it was never mandated. Now it is, or should be. This does not mean they get the same training as a Police Officer will go through. In order for any agency to get their CALEA, is they would actually have to be a Police Agency, not "Special Police". I realize that your goal has probably been to get into LE, but being a SPO, will not exactly count as LE experience. Yes you do similar jobs as some police agencies, however, their is no real formal training required, no mandatd in-depth background checks. All is required is a simple FBI fingerprint background.

    Although you wil lbe attending some type of "academy". It is not a Police Academt that will allow you to transfer to another agency, such as Maryland or Virginia.
    In furthermore at Howard and any other college or university to be an SPO. It is MANDATEd that you have to attend the University Consortium Police Academy. I dont know what agency you are talking about but they did an in depth background investigation on me. Alot more than an FBI fingerprint check. Checks as far as criminal, driving record, even credit. Irishlad2nv you seem to be the expert on here on Everything this time I think you need to get your facts straight and admit that you MAY be wrong. Just like with the last debate with AACC. As a public Safety Officer I was classified as a state employee. I got all the same exdact benifits including the Maryland State Pension System. If I got another job and it was with the state that time would have added up. No as a Public Safety Officer I didnt receive the Law Enforcement Officer Pension System and of course we wernt covered under the Police Officer Bill of Rights thats fine. I really didnt care.
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    In order for any agency to get their CALEA, is they would actually have to be a Police Agency, not "Special Police".
    Isnt that what you said. You said it as if you didnt know they were accreditted. Howard University is working towards that. I never said I was a police officer. I actually would love being a special police officer. Basically work gets left at work. I live far away in Maryland so more than likely if someting of a serious nature did occur on campus and someone got mad and had a bad taste in there mouth. They would have to travel far as hell to handle it. Jurisdiction on the grounds of Howard is all that I would need. All that I have to focus on is what happened on the grounds of those walls. Nothing more nothing less. Thats the main thing or if something hapened on off campus property. I would say that in my interveiw that Howards SPO's have jurisdiction up to 500 feet off campus but i know you would really flip your wig and not beleive it than so Ill leave that alone. I love Howard. I love the atmosphere. I know for a fact that I will enjoy working there and thats all that matters. I dont care what anybody else thinks.
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishlad2nv View Post
    Not even attempting to "bad-mouth". Theres a very distinct difference between a Sworn Law Enforcement Officer and a Special Police Officer. Being a "sworn SPO" is not being a "sworn Police Officer". That's very important not to get confused.

    Yes I know GW is CALEA accredited. They are 1 of very few colleges that actually are.
    aI know that tere is a difference between the two. I am very much aware of it. I honestly wouldnt even want to be involved with any incidents that would happen off duty or off the grounds of the campus.
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    Theres a very distinct difference between a Sworn Law Enforcement Officer and a Special Police Officer. Being a "sworn SPO" is not being a "sworn Police Officer".
    If, I am not mistaken a "law enforcement officer" is a sworn official, that is given the authority to "enforce" laws of the country, state and local levels. SPO's are enfact "sworn" and are given the authority to "enforce" aforesaid laws on "privately" owned property. So as Irish stated, there is a difference, and that difference is the "public" and "private" sectors. If you are granted the authority to make an arrest, and have taken the oath of office then you are a "law enforcement officer". It is very much important to learn every aspect of the profession you have chosen. We all come on these boards to share and learn "some" information. It's also very much important to take what you have read and/or hear and do your own homework. Think of it like a computer. You walk in a store, pick out the PC or laptop and walk out of the store. You just walked out with "old" computer, because tomorrow the new model comes out. The law changes frequently, and it's hard as hell to keep up with the changes.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BadBoynMD View Post
    If, I am not mistaken a "law enforcement officer" is a sworn official, that is given the authority to "enforce" laws of the country, state and local levels. SPO's are enfact "sworn" and are given the authority to "enforce" aforesaid laws on "privately" owned property. So as Irish stated, there is a difference, and that difference is the "public" and "private" sectors. If you are granted the authority to make an arrest, and have taken the oath of office then you are a "law enforcement officer". It is very much important to learn every aspect of the profession you have chosen. We all come on these boards to share and learn "some" information. It's also very much important to take what you have read and/or hear and do your own homework. Think of it like a computer. You walk in a store, pick out the PC or laptop and walk out of the store. You just walked out with "old" computer, because tomorrow the new model comes out. The law changes frequently, and it's hard as hell to keep up with the changes.
    I couldnt have put it better myself.
    Last edited by DPS55; 05-15-2007 at 03:14 PM.
    "Damned if you do and damned if you dont"

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