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  1. #26
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    Heres a list of items. You need to remember though, some of these items listed have been challenged in court and are legitimate. This list is in general terms, when you get to specifics, there are some acceptions. Example: They list residential telephone line, however, LEO has an acception to it because you are FORCED to have the line. They also list home security systems, but it you have a home business you can. Like one poster wrote, if you can find a CPA who specializes in LEO, pay the extra money, it is worth it.

    List of Nondeductible Expenses

    Adoption expenses.

    Broker's commissions that you paid in connection with your IRA or other investment property.

    Burial or funeral expenses, including the cost of a cemetery lot.

    Campaign expenses.

    Capital expenses.

    Check-writing fees.

    Club dues.

    Commuting expenses.

    Fees and licenses, such as car licenses, marriage licenses, and dog tags.

    Fines and penalties, such as parking tickets.

    Health spa expenses.

    Hobby losses—but see Hobby expenses, earlier.

    Home repairs, insurance, and rent.

    Home security system.

    Illegal bribes and kickbacks—see Bribes and kickbacks in chapter 11 of Publication 535.

    Investment-related seminars.

    Life insurance premiums.

    Lobbying expenses.

    Losses from the sale of your home, furniture, personal car, etc.

    Lost or misplaced cash or property.

    Lunches with co-workers.

    Meals while working late.

    Medical expenses as business expenses.

    Personal disability insurance premiums.

    Personal legal expenses.

    Personal, living, or family expenses.

    Political contributions.

    Professional accreditation fees.

    Professional reputation, expenses to improve.

    Relief fund contributions.

    Residential telephone line.

    Stockholders' meeting, expenses of attending.

    Tax-exempt income, expenses of earning or collecting.

    The value of wages never received or lost vacation time.

    Travel expenses for another individual.

    Voluntary unemployment benefit fund contributions.

    Wristwatches.
    Last edited by ray8285; 01-08-2009 at 02:03 PM.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fubeca View Post
    Most of the expenses people are listing are what are referred to as "Miscelleaneous Business Expenses". These are allowed but are subject to a 2% floor.

    So 1st you have to itemize your deductions to be able to take them, 2nd the aggregate amount must exceed 2% of your AGI (adjusted gross income) before it actually makes a difference on your tax return.

    So let's say a police office makes $75,000 and their AGI is $50,000. The employee expenses would have to exceed $1,000 before making a difference. The first $1,000 of expenses would not be deductible, but any amount over that threshold could be deducted.

    There is a lot of mis-information in this thread so far. I recommend that everyone consult a tax expert or read the rules before taking any deduction. Make sure you can back it up before you put it on your tax return.

    I'm sure your agencies wouldn't appreciate knowing that you were breaking the law on your taxes while trying to enforce the law in your jurisdiction.
    Please.....Mr. Technology Consultant,,,,,,feel free to list the 'misinformation' in this thread......

    Most of what has been posted is correct.....I deduct EVERYTHING that I am allowed to do.....there are several CPAs in the LA area that make a boat load of money every year from doing several thousand LEO and Fire employee tax returns at both the state and federal level..........they also offer audit representation if needed......they love nothing more than to make the IRS pay even MORE $$$$$ after the audit......they also will tell you up front what items are the current 'red flags' (Milage, Home Office, excessive misc deductions) that the IRS computer will bring up for further attention.....

    There are MANY deductions that we are allowed to use, that the general public cannot.....Each and EVERY business has such 'specific' deductions......

    The trick is to not stretch the rules and fudge your deductions....that WILL get you into hot water.....
    The posts on this forum by this poster are of his personal opinion, and his personal opinion alone

    "Politicians are like diapers. They need to be changed often and for the same reason"

    "We fight not for glory; nor for wealth; nor honor, but only and alone we fight for freedom, which no good man surrenders but with his life"

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by LA DEP View Post
    Please.....Mr. Technology Consultant,,,,,,feel free to list the 'misinformation' in this thread......

    Sorry LA DEP. I must have come across with an attitude that I didn't intend. I wasn't trying to call anyone out specifically. Just let people know that it would be in their best interest to consult someone who specializes in taxes - or look up the rules themselves before taking deductions they are not familiar with.

    There have been things mentioned that either are not deductible, not deductible to an employee but okay for a contractor, or that are not deductible without specific circumstances. Also, there are important things to understand about how and where things are deducted (ie items subject to 2% floor vs not subject to 2% floor and medical expenses which are subject to the 7.5% floor.)

    Some posts are entirely acurate but not all.

    I am a tax accountant who now focuses on using technology in the tax return process for our organization. Unfortunately, our tax code and regs are very, very complex and it is not possible to be expert in all areas of tax law. I am not expert in everything but do have a lot of experience in tax preparation.

    I'm all for taking every deduction/credit that we as citizens are eligible for - I don't want the government getting any of my money that they aren't legally entitled to.

  4. #29
    Molon Labe
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fubeca View Post
    Sorry LA DEP. I must have come across with an attitude that I didn't intend. I wasn't trying to call anyone out specifically. Just let people know that it would be in their best interest to consult someone who specializes in taxes - or look up the rules themselves before taking deductions they are not familiar with.

    There have been things mentioned that either are not deductible, not deductible to an employee but okay for a contractor, or that are not deductible without specific circumstances. Also, there are important things to understand about how and where things are deducted (ie items subject to 2% floor vs not subject to 2% floor and medical expenses which are subject to the 7.5% floor.)

    Some posts are entirely acurate but not all.

    I am a tax accountant who now focuses on using technology in the tax return process for our organization. Unfortunately, our tax code and regs are very, very complex and it is not possible to be expert in all areas of tax law. I am not expert in everything but do have a lot of experience in tax preparation.

    I'm all for taking every deduction/credit that we as citizens are eligible for - I don't want the government getting any of my money that they aren't legally entitled to.
    copy.....

    You are absolutely correct in saying to use an accountant if you are going to use alot of business deductions.....preferably one who specializes in LEO and other emergency services 'type' professionals.....there are more than a few here in the LA area, but we also have more than enough cops/firemen ect to keep them in business too......

    There are some deductions that we can take that others cannot.....just like pretty much every other profession out there.......

    Some years it wont be worth it to itemize everything, because you wont be over the 2% amount.....but, if you have just been hired, or just went to patrol training ect, then you will probably have more than enough equipment expenses to justify the effort.......

    What I have been told by several accountants (including one that used to work for the 'Dark Side') is to not get overly 'creative' with your deductions.....that tends to draw unwanted attention, to say the least.....
    The posts on this forum by this poster are of his personal opinion, and his personal opinion alone

    "Politicians are like diapers. They need to be changed often and for the same reason"

    "We fight not for glory; nor for wealth; nor honor, but only and alone we fight for freedom, which no good man surrenders but with his life"

  5. #30
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    I claim half of my home phone service (we are required by law to have phone service for employment)

    All uniform expenses, if you don't have a quartermaster system

    All equipment, including leather, backup gun, vehicle equipment

  6. #31
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    I am an IRS employee and the crap I have read in this thread makes me shake my head and wonder does any one respect the tax laws. Here we have sworn law enforcment officers basicly admiting to tax fraud. There is a perjury statement on the return so any misinformation on the return is breaking the laws you are sworn to uphold. You should read the info at this link.
    Last edited by cj9788; 01-10-2009 at 03:36 AM.

  7. #32
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    oh noes they are spying!!





    in all seriousness, i just read a thread on "what can we write off" you read a thread on "what can we lie about" typical IRS attitude..
    In the end we're all just chalk lines on the concrete drawn only to be washed away, for the time that I've been given, I am what I am. I'd rather you hate me for everything I am, Than have you love me for being something that Im not

  8. #33
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    A few years ago, the IRS put out a list of what can be deducted by LEO's and what cannot. I haven't been able to find it, but the key thing was that whatever the deduction was for, it could only be used for work (ie.. you can deduct long distace or toll calls made for work, but not 1/2 your phone bill because of it, you can buy a suit for work, but that same suit can be worn off duty and is not deductable).

    Anyway, while looking for it I came across this.


    http://www.irs.gov/compliance/enforc...123436,00.html

    Enforcing the Laws and Paying Taxes: Is There a Connection?

    When you became a law enforcement officer, you took an oath to fairly and to impartially enforce the laws. The public looks to you to not only enforce the law but also expects that you will also comply with the law. That is why I would like to talk about a very important issue, your duty and responsibility to pay income taxes.

    In the recent past, IRS Criminal Investigation has prosecuted tax professionals for preparing false income tax returns for their clients who were primarily law enforcement officers. During trial of the tax preparers, questions were raised about the police officer's knowledge of the false deductions or omission of income, the degree of participation by the officer in the filing of the false returns, the potential criminal and/or civil liability of the officer, and the credibility of the officer in other matters.

    As a fellow law enforcement officer, I would like to offer some key points to consider when preparing your tax returns. (1) Taxpayers are responsible for the accuracy of all entries made on their tax returns, which includes all related schedules and supporting documentation. This remains true whether the return is prepared by the taxpayer or a return preparer. (2) Select a reputable tax professional to prepare your return. Be wary of any practitioner who claims to be a “specialist” in preparing returns for law enforcement officers or promises a large refund based on special deductions. (3) Tax evasion is a risky crime, a felony, punishable by 5 years imprisonment and a $250,000 fine. There are also severe civil sanctions which can be imposed.

    Criminal prosecution for tax violations, at a minimum, impairs the officer's credibility as a witness in any future criminal proceedings and often leads to departmental disciplinary action including dismissal.

    What Income is Taxable?

    Law enforcement officers, like all taxpayers, are responsible for paying the correct amount of tax on all income they receive unless that income is specifically excluded by the Internal Revenue Code (IRC). This includes income from your law enforcement job as well as any income earned from outside employment. Other sources of taxable income might include workmen’s compensation payments, disability income, performance bonuses or monetary awards.

    The total amount received must be reported, regardless if this income was received in the form of cash, check or in exchange for services.

    Below are statistical data from our Criminal Investigation Management Information System on individuals who are employed as law enforcement officers or firefighters.

    What Tactics Are Used By Dishonest Tax Preparers?
    Dishonest tax preparers use a variety of legal sounding methods to formulate fraudulent and illegal deductions to reduce taxable income. These can include, but at not limited to, the following:

    (1) Encouraging police officers to “incorporate” ostensibly for the purpose of allowing them to deduct "expenses" thereby reducing total income. In fact, many of the expenses used are inflated or non-deductible;

    (2) Encouraging police officers to establish foreign corporations or enter into fraudulent trust agreements;

    (3) Preparing a fraudulent Schedule C, Profit or Loss From Business, for the purpose of claiming false deductions to offset virtually all Form 1099, Miscellaneous Income, or income earned from outside employment; and

    (4) Including false and inflated itemized deductions on Schedule A, Itemized Deductions, or Form 2106, Employee Business Expenses.

    The dishonest tax preparers capitalize on greed. They succeed because they become masters at claiming false deductions through the systematic abuse of the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code (IRC). Criminal Investigation has a Tax Fraud Alert web page with additional information about abusive return preparers at www.irs.gov (Keyword: Fraud).

    What Should You Do If You Filed Returns In The Past That You Know Are False or Incorrect?
    You should amend these returns by filing a Form 1040X, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, for the years in question and pay any amount of tax due or owing.

    How Do You Report Suspected Tax Fraud Activity?
    If you suspect tax fraud or know of an abusive return preparer, you should report this activity to the IRS.

    The Standards of Conduct Model Policy written by the International Association of Chiefs of Police and issued August 1, 1997, states under section IV, Procedures, "... officers shall not violate any law or any agency policy, rule, or procedure." The IRS does not want you to jeopardize your career by becoming involved in tax fraud.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by cj9788 View Post
    I am an IRS employee and the crap I have read in this thread makes me shake my head and wonder does any one respect the tax laws. Here we have sworn law enforcment officers basicly admiting to tax fraud. There is a perjury statement on the return so any misinformation on the return is breaking the laws you are sworn to uphold. You should read the info at this link.
    NOPE!

    Abolish the illegal federal income tax and I'll gladly introduce more respect.

    I pay my taxes in full. I'm a slave to the government. I work for 'free' 3 months out of the year.... doesn't mean I have to give any respect.... especially to the IRS, thank ya very much.
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  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chit2001 View Post
    NOPE!

    Abolish the illegal federal income tax and I'll gladly introduce more respect.

    I pay my taxes in full. I'm a slave to the government. I work for 'free' 3 months out of the year.... doesn't mean I have to give any respect.... especially to the IRS, thank ya very much.
    You do not have to respect the IRS but you should respect the tax laws of the United States. Remember your sworn oath to uphold the laws of the State where you work and the laws of the United States. Your attitude is no diffrent than the punk you arrested for speeding or any other offence you observed. You seem to have the same contempt of the law, or should I say a law you do not agree with. What makes you any diffrent that person who called you a pig because it is your job to enforce the stupid law they broke? Just becasue you do not agree with it does not change the fact that it is the law.

    Federal taxes are not illegal, look at this link from the IRS, those claims have been decided time and time again to be baseless.

    The Truth About Frivolous Tax Arguments

    INTRODUCTION

    This responds to some of the more common frivolous “legal arguments” made by individuals and groups who oppose compliance with the federal tax laws. The first section groups these arguments under six general categories, with variations within each category. Each contention is briefly explained, followed by a discussion of the legal authority that rejects the contention. The second section responds to some of the more common frivolous arguments made in collection due process cases brought pursuant to sections 6320 or 6330. These arguments are grouped under ten general categories and contain a brief description of each contention followed by a discussion of the correct legal authority. A final section explains the penalties that the courts may impose on those who pursue tax cases on frivolous grounds. It should be noted that tyhe cases cited as relevant legal authority are illustrative and are not intended to provide an all-inclusive list relating to frivolous tax arguments.



    Madchicken you found the link in my previous post it is a good read.


    Mstangfk I did not mean to come off as a spy I found the thread and some of the posts do offer insight but some are basicly admitting fraud. Think about when you are off duty in the mall, you still see people breaking the law your not looking for it but you see it none the less. It is no diffrent with us pencil pushers who examine tax returns. I did not see a thread about what can be lied about it just so happend that that is what some people have posted.
    Last edited by cj9788; 01-10-2009 at 05:55 PM.

  11. #36
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    ok cj don't tell us what we can't do. Join the thread in it's proper spirit and explain what we can deduct.

  12. #37
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    It is a little more complicated than that. In fact there is a check list at one of the forum sponsors above. The problem with the list is it makes seem all inclusive. Not every thing on the list can be deducted in all all situatons. For example it mentions auto boat registration fees. Those can only be deducted if based on the value of the auto/boat. If the fee is based on anything other than value then it is not allowed. Sometimes it is easier to point out what can not be duducted.

    The best advice I have read throught out the thread and advice I often give is see a professional tax preparer. Ask your preparer questions and then call the IRS to double check. The IRS is unforgiven because the law does not allow it. The taxpayer is responsible for info in the return, if it is a bogus deduction then it does not matter if the deduction was based on bad advice. It can be an honest clerical mistake, but clerical mistakes on tax returns often have huge consequences in the form of penalties and interest.

    The IRS does not have a publication geared specificly towards public saftey officers. There are no special rules for cops or firefighters. That take home car maybe exempt from income then again it may fall under the rules of fringe benefits. That overtime earned during a time of a disaster maybe exempt from fica and medicare taxes or it may not depending on the situation.

    I just do not want any one much less a police officer to make a mistake based on bad advice on thier 1040. The IRS is slow but sure and I can tell you that if every deduction is not legit or can not be verified in your records it will be denied. For every $1000.00 lost in deduction it can mean up to 100 to 200 dollars of tax maybe more that has to be paid. That plus the pen & int and the fact that the IRS has up to three years after a return is filed can mean some hefty fines.

    Good luck guys some of you are really going to need it. If you have any questions dont mind answering them. I love the forums I have been a lurker for a while but when I saw this thread I just had to say something.
    Last edited by cj9788; 01-10-2009 at 07:36 PM.

  13. #38
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    CJ, I got a lot of over time due to IKE, how do I know if it is exempt? Would it be based on the fact that the department considered itself 'mobilized'? Is there any chance we will ever go to a flat tax where there are not all these silly rules and laws to keep up with?

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by cj9788 View Post
    If you have any questions dont mind answering them. I love the forums I have been a lurker for a while but when I saw this thread I just had to say something.
    OK I have a legit question. According to the IRS unless I have to pay ATM I am not required to file the ATM worksheet. So a couple of years ago I did my taxes, using turbo tax and filed electronically. As such turbo tax only submits what is required by law. Yet the IRS sends me a letter asking for the darn worksheet which I was not required by law to file.
    What was up with that???
    Am I suposed to do the IRS's job?
    My reponse was to send them a letter certified reminding them of what is required by law to be filed. Never heard back.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by cj9788 View Post
    You do not have to respect the IRS but you should respect the tax laws of the United States. Remember your sworn oath to uphold the laws of the State where you work and the laws of the United States. Your attitude is no diffrent than the punk you arrested for speeding or any other offence you observed. You seem to have the same contempt of the law, or should I say a law you do not agree with. What makes you any diffrent that person who called you a pig because it is your job to enforce the stupid law they broke? Just becasue you do not agree with it does not change the fact that it is the law.
    You can't be serious. Well, maybe you are (yikes).

    Where does it say in my oath that I must respect unconstitutional laws? Please, sir, I'm honestly excited to see what you come up with.

    I'm not talking about state laws, ya dip. I'm talking about the FEDERAL income tax. My state tax laws are in place because my state's citizens have had a say in it. Don't drink all the Kool-Aid, cj, as I might want some after I get done banging my head against my desk.

    By the way, in case you're wondering, I've NEVER not paid my taxes. I pay them because I'm pretty much in the beginning years of my career. No need to mess that up and end up in prison because the IRS breaks my door down and sends me to prison for violating a 'law' which they can't even produce for me if I ask for it.
    Last edited by Chit2001; 01-11-2009 at 10:53 AM.
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    Deductions for Law Enforcement

    As a Calif. Registerd Tax Preparer and peace officer, I think I might be able to shed some light on this subject. Misc. itemized deductions must be at least 2% of your adjusted gross income. Common deductions for law enforcement include uniform costs, uniform maintenance (inlcluding dry cleaning & tailoring) equipment and accessories. Other items can include mileage (standard rate is 58.5 cents a mile which is strongly recommended to use), hair cuts, if your agency enforces grooming standards, union dues, and training (if involved non-reimbursed expenses). As a corrections officer I too have to deduct many of these items year after year, and as a registered tax preparer in Calif., I also have to recommend them to law enforcement clients. But you must also remember to take into account the amount your agency pays you in uniform allowance, and that because it is labeled Uniform allowance, it is very easy to justify using those funds specifically for uniform expenses and not other expenses. Basically any expense connected to your job (and there are usually many of them) that was paid out of your out of your pocket can be deducted. You must also watch for things that can be construed as personal usage like home office deductions. The home office deductions were established to mostly aide self-employed individuals. So as peace officers, if you're counting on using home office deductions be prepared to substantiate your claims in full detail because the IRS will definitely take a look at your returrn. I only recommend costs of stationary supplies to my clients (pens,pencils, printer paper, etc). Also a word of caution...every year tax time comes up people hunt for preparers who promise big refunds. And every year I hear of someone going to fraudulent tax preparer who cost them an audit. Make sure your tax preparer is legal, make sure they SIGN the return and at least have a preparer ID number. To date, Calif and Oregon are the only states that require tax preparers to be educated, bonded, and registered. If you owe a lot of back tax money (i.e. more than 10,000), you don't necessarily have to hire a tax attorney. Seek out an Enrolled Agent or CPA. They have the legal ability to represent you before the IRS. If there are any other questions I'd be happy to answer them the best I can. I'll check this post frequently.

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    Response to question

    Quote Originally Posted by luvmylabs View Post
    OK I have a legit question. According to the IRS unless I have to pay ATM I am not required to file the ATM worksheet. So a couple of years ago I did my taxes, using turbo tax and filed electronically. As such turbo tax only submits what is required by law. Yet the IRS sends me a letter asking for the darn worksheet which I was not required by law to file.
    What was up with that???
    Am I suposed to do the IRS's job?
    My reponse was to send them a letter certified reminding them of what is required by law to be filed. Never heard back.
    I am a Calif tax preparer, so I'll try to answer this one for you. I think what you're referring to is Alternative Minimum Tax, aka AMT. Depending on your Adjusted gross income amount, a majority of taxpayers are NOT subject to AMT. Turbo tax does have the ability to filter out whether a taxpayer would be subject to the AMT. If you sent them a letter by certified mail, and you received no response, unless you've received a receipt of that letter you sent, don't just assume the IRS has just dismissed your return. I would contact them, and ask if the issue was resolved. If you have the receipt from the certified mail you at least have proof that you attempted to resolve the issue if ever they question it in the future. Try not to look at it as doing the IRS's job, but make sure you are crossing your t's and dotting your i's. I don't know of any worksheet other than the typical forms that go along with 1040 schedules, so I don't exactly know what they are referencing. I hope this helped. If you have any other questions I'd be glad to try to answer them.

  18. #43
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    I'm trying to sort out fact from fiction. One of the Deputies I work with said that a tax person told them we can claim one of our meals on shift as a tax deductions since we work 12s. A little about our agency, our Department is one of them Departments where all of our people are fully certified law enforcement officers. We work the jail and the road both are assigned to work 12 hour shifts. The question isn't so much for the road part of it because they can stop where ever they like, but the jail part of it.

    Sheriff Deputies who are in the jail can't leave to get food so what they usually do is have one designated person go get it or brown bag it. Because of the work load on a lot of shifts they can't always eat during the shift during the 12 hours. (I'm not saying all the time, because there is time some times when 15 + Federal Inmates come in that have to be totally processed.)

    I have looked over the IRS web site and one a few other web sites and I can't find anything about this credit. Normally I don't itemize anything, but this year I am. I have attended a lot of training on my own time, bought a bunch of new equipment including a new backup weapon, not to mention stuff for our rental house. Well you get the picture, I'm thinking this year it may be worth itemizing.

    Also I saw someone say something in an early post that you can claim mileage to and from training you attend on your own time and training that you are required to attend. Is that true and if so how do you calculate that? We are required to attend in service training once a month on our day off. Also I have attended training where it started on my days on and continued to my days off where I wasn't paid for. Any help would be great.


    Thanks

    Billy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Centurion44 View Post
    And you know this how? What's the percentage? Any cops been audited before get penalized for doing such? Please share.
    I had a buddy that got audited writing off everything he could think of. ie haircuts, dry cleaning, uniform, cell phone, and other up keep. He showed proof he paid and it worked out in the end.

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    CJ9788- Show me the law.. Also in tax code it self it says its voluntary.

    I took an Oath to the Constitution.

    You should check out http://oathkeepers.org/oath/

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    Quote Originally Posted by SHERIFF View Post
    Some of you are riding on borrowed time before you get audited, IMHO.
    +1

    Before you become innovative with your deductions, you'd better check with a professional.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rshen11 View Post
    CJ9788- Show me the law.. Also in tax code it self it says its voluntary.

    I took an Oath to the Constitution.

    You should check out http://oathkeepers.org/oath/
    I hope you're not serious.

    Why don't you tell that to the BOP (for whom it appears you work) or CBP (for whom it appears you want to work) and see what they say.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldBadge View Post
    I hope you're not serious.

    Why don't you tell that to the BOP (for whom it appears you work) or CBP (for whom it appears you want to work) and see what they say.
    Or ask around the cell block, I've noticed a lot of IRS cases on the docket lately!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chit2001 View Post
    NOPE!

    Abolish the illegal federal income tax and I'll gladly introduce more respect.

    I pay my taxes in full. I'm a slave to the government. I work for 'free' 3 months out of the year.... doesn't mean I have to give any respect.... especially to the IRS, thank ya very much.
    Yes...The Federal Income tax is Illegal...look it up..

    The graduated income tax in this country is from the communist manifesto isnt it?

  25. #50
    Reserve Police Officer
    Aux_Hoo's Avatar
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    Feb 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldBadge View Post
    +1

    Before you become innovative with your deductions, you'd better check with a professional.
    +1...but only if it's a material amount and you have doubts about it's tax treatment. Tax pros (and imitators) get expensive quick and there's plenty of answers online and built into tax software. If you want to spend the money, have a pro review EVERYTHING one year and then use that as guidance going forward (until they change the tax law, of course).

    RE: getting audited - just like it's a risk-reward decision for you to deduct something and have it reversed on audit, it's a risk-reward decision for the IRS/state to audit you. They have a ton of businesses and Obama's "people making over $250,000 a year" to go after first.

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