1. #1
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    History (definition) of the word "COP"?

    Constable On Patrol?

    I have also read and heard that "COP" is representative of the copper badge and/or copper buttons that were present on a constable's uniform.

    Curious.

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    I've heard both as well. I don't really know which is more correct, and I'm not sure anyone truly does. But I believe the 'copper' explanation is the more accepted story.
    Caution and worry never accomplished anything.

  3. #3
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    Saw this on a website:

    To cut to the chase, the police sense of "copper" and "cop" probably comes originally from the Latin word "capere," meaning "to seize," which also gave us "capture." "Cop" as a slang term meaning "to catch, snatch or grab" appeared in English in the 18th century, ironically originally used among thieves -- a "copper" was a street thief. But by the middle of the 19th century, criminals apprehended by the police were said to have themselves been "copped" -- caught -- by the "coppers" or "cops." And there you have the etiology of "cop." Case, as the cops say, closed.

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    In England the police officers over there were called bobbies. I believe they still are. The police wore copper badges and so they started to be called coppers, as a nickname, which was shortened down to the slang of "cops."

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    where did bobbies come from
    From there founder Sir Robert Piel

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    I believe it is from the copper buttons the first American police force uniforms had which was Philadelphia. Could be mistaken.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmak
    In England the police officers over there were called bobbies. I believe they still are. The police wore copper badges and so they started to be called coppers, as a nickname, which was shortened down to the slang of "cops."
    We are called alot of things, "bobbies" not being one of them, the term bobbies did derive from Sir Robert Peel, founder of the police
    another bit of useless info the helmets we wear were originally taken from the 18th centuary russian cavalary helmet.
    How would you like a long stretch inside?? and i aint talking about a prison sentence

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    Those helmets weren't all that useless..they were sturdy enough for an officer to stand on so the could peek over walls. Seems silly and theres more to the story but I seem to be blanking at the moment
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    Quote Originally Posted by britplod
    We are called alot of things, "bobbies" not being one of them,
    I think you'll find that in some regions of the UK that we are still called Bobbies as a friendly nickname amongst reasonable people.

  10. #10
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    I think the most common one I've heard is that it came from the copper badge and buttons (although 'copping' makes sense in regards to catching the bad guys).

    In regards to Bobbies, there is a small explanation on the Met's website under history. It can be found --HERE--

    The brief explanation says:

    Sir Richard Mayne, Joint Commissioner Peel stressed that the principal duty of the police was to be crime prevention (rather than detection.) The nicknames 'Peelers' and 'Bobbies' were uncomplimentary results of his decision to make the force directly responsible to himself in the Home Office.

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