1. #1
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    Compensated GLOCKs

    I haven't found any reviews online, and I haven't had the chance to shoot one myself, so I'm wondering if any of you have experience with any of the compensated GLOCKS. Does the compensation really make a difference, or is it all just hype? Are there any disadvantages to going with a compensated?

    What are your thoughts?

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    They DO work, but...

    There are some drawbacks. For instance, if yours is a 9 mil then you should'nt even bother; keep in mind that the effectiveness of the comp is relative to the recoil impulse (in other works, the stiffer the kick, the higher percentage of recoil is reduced); so they work fantabulous with a 40 and magic with a 10 mil. keep in mind, though, that the older tactical glocks (with the vertical ports) will darn near blind you temporarily, so go with the new ones(V-pattern). I prefer my Springfield XD tactical with the V-10 comp which is partially inset to the slide; thereby reducing the rearward gas flow and extra noise usually associated with the comp.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by toasterlocker
    I haven't found any reviews online, and I haven't had the chance to shoot one myself, so I'm wondering if any of you have experience with any of the compensated GLOCKS. Does the compensation really make a difference, or is it all just hype? Are there any disadvantages to going with a compensated?

    What are your thoughts?
    From what I have heard the compensated Glocks spew all kinds of hot powder residue and are definitely NOT the way to go for a duty weapon. Also if you are shooting in the dark, the flash can be pretty blinding/disorienting. I've only shot the uncompensated Glocks, so I can't comment on the difference in muzzle jump.
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    Bear in mind also that those hot gases will slap you good should you have to fire one in a guarded position. I've heard one person do this with a 357 sig caliber Glock 31 and peeled flesh back off of bone on his lower cheek firing it this way. I cannot verify this but those exhaust blast would hurt!

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    Smile Yes...

    Quote Originally Posted by madic15al
    Bear in mind also that those hot gases will slap you good should you have to fire one in a guarded position. I've heard one person do this with a 357 sig caliber Glock 31 and peeled flesh back off of bone on his lower cheek firing it this way. I cannot verify this but those exhaust blast would hurt!
    Regardless of whether this actually happened, it is probably not a good idea to include ports on LE weapons for a few reasons (as much as I like them myself):

    1. If you need to perform slide ops and the weapon discharges; ouch.

    2. The temp. blinding in low light is not a good thing when the other guy is likely running around while he shoots back.

    3. The additional blast/sound will interfere with knowing when your partner is coming up behind you....
    "It's not how far the shot was; it's how close you were able to get."

    --Jeff Cooper

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberusdog
    Regardless of whether this actually happened, it is probably not a good idea to include ports on LE weapons for a few reasons (as much as I like them myself):

    1. If you need to perform slide ops and the weapon discharges; ouch.

    2. The temp. blinding in low light is not a good thing when the other guy is likely running around while he shoots back.

    3. The additional blast/sound will interfere with knowing when your partner is coming up behind you....

    As far as #2 the LE rounds I've tested using a G22c are all low flash signature rounds and do not exhibit flash that would even bother you on follow up shots and this was done in incrementally dark to complete darkness.

    As far as #1 don't ever put your hand near the muzzle, I don't see a reason why you would ever have to.

    As far as #3 they are a little bit louder, I am sure the 10mm is a quite a bit louder but who carries a 10mm in LE anymore. The .40 S&W (short and weak)
    killed the 10mm in LE.

    If you ever shoot the gun held close to you it will burn you regardless of the low flash qualities of the round....and that is why for duty I'd pass on em.
    Trooperden, akman75, & azmichelle ignored

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    Cool But of course....

    Quote Originally Posted by 6233108
    As far as #2 the LE rounds I've tested using a G22c are all low flash signature rounds and do not exhibit flash that would even bother you on follow up shots and this was done in incrementally dark to complete darkness.

    As far as #1 don't ever put your hand near the muzzle, I don't see a reason why you would ever have to.

    As far as #3 they are a little bit louder, I am sure the 10mm is a quite a bit louder but who carries a 10mm in LE anymore. The .40 S&W (short and weak)
    killed the 10mm in LE.

    If you ever shoot the gun held close to you it will burn you regardless of the low flash qualities of the round....and that is why for duty I'd pass on em.
    The aforementioned were merely possibilities and unlikely to actually happen. But if there any depts. out there who authorize/issue the comp. models I would like to hear from you; I happen to enjoy them a great deal, and perhaps a little input would persuade the powers that be that the quicker target acq. is worth it...
    "It's not how far the shot was; it's how close you were able to get."

    --Jeff Cooper

  8. #8
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    I carry a Glock 21C. Just wanted to try it out and see how it would function. The upward venting of gass is a slight problem at night, so will probably get an unvented barrel from Glock. I work day shift only now but it may present a issue for night work. I shoot at an indoor range a lot and have not really found any major problem with followup shots.

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    Technicaly the guns are ported, not compensated. Porting is holes in the barrel that simply allows gas to escape upwards; compensation is when there is a baffle chamber that allows the escaping gas to push on the muzzle on the gun. I have a compensated gun called a "hybrid" and let me tell the recoil reduction of a ported gun dosen't even come close in comparison.

  10. #10
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    Proper grip and stance will allow any properly trained shooter, regardless of size, to control the recoil and muzzle flip of any combat handgun. IMHO porting (compensating) a combat handgun is not worth the brawbacks.

    1. Even with low flash ammo there will be more flash in front of your face and that is never good in a low light gunfight.

    2. As mentioned before, if you have to fire the weapon from a close contact position (near your body) you will get hot gas and powder residue in your face and possibly in your eyes. Again, this is not good in a gunfight.

    I have instructed hundreds of students, including small women, to shoot combat handguns and none of them needed a compensated (ported) weapon.

    Proper GRIP and STANCE = control of recoil and muzzle flip.

    Regards,

    Phoenix

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    Ain't no predetermined square range in a gun fight and I hope I get the perfect grip during an "o'**** I'm about to die" draw. Porting is something that allows for a little more margin of error during the stress of a reactionary shootng and gun fights at night are so low distance affairs a little more muzzle flash isn't going to hurt anything.

    Who shoots a handgun near their own face?

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    Quote Originally Posted by JRT6
    Ain't no predetermined square range in a gun fight and I hope I get the perfect grip during an "o'**** I'm about to die" draw. Porting is something that allows for a little more margin of error during the stress of a reactionary shootng and gun fights at night are so low distance affairs a little more muzzle flash isn't going to hurt anything.

    Who shoots a handgun near their own face?
    At distances of less than seven yards (where most gunfights occur) and under the dynamic conditions of a gunfight, a compensated handgun will not help you succeed. In low light condition, at close range, more muzzle flash is the last thing you want. Why do you think law enforcement ammo is designed to be

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    [QUOTE=Phoenix]At distances of less than seven yards (where most gunfights occur) and under the dynamic conditions of a gunfight, a compensated handgun will not help you succeed. In low light condition, at close range, more muzzle flash is the last thing you want. Why do you think law enforcement ammo is designed to be

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by JRT6
    A few departments in my area have carried ported glocks for some years and muzzle flash has never been an issue in seven yards. At that distance one is much to target foused too see anything else. When a cop is pulling the trigger as fast as they can under fight or flight reaction the porting can the difference between keeping the gun on target or not a CQB..
    A few departments in the U.S. still issue revolvers (my agency only banned them recently) and they are not a problem a seven yards either. Relying on the handgun choice of law enforcement agencies as a test of performance or effectiveness is futile. NYPD has 12 pound triggers on their Glocks, Is that because that is the best trigger in a gunfight? NO! It's to compensate for a lack of training (trigger finger discipline.)

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    Dude I can't say what you see in your world ain't true. I see the ported guns at schools everywhere and yes technically they are in the minority and frankly I don't give a rat's ***. The point is that you made several suppositions about muzzle flash and not being able to see **** in hypothetical shootouts that no ones ever been in. Here's a fact for you:

    My departments range is used by several departments. When I run range 80% of the course of fire is low light. Departments with ported guns have never had problems with multiple targets or target identification, burning their faces or whatever other hypothetical problem you can think of. You keep harping on loosing night vision when dude we work in the metro area around here and there is no night vision. Take a ported out, turn the lights down low but not off and see for your self.

    I don't care what other agencies do: didn't you'r mother ever use the analogy of jumping off a bridge...

    Bill Wilson was the biggest gamer of his time and he started the IDPA it was because he counldn't win anymore in IPSC.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JRT6
    Dude I can't say what you see in your world ain't true. I see the ported guns at schools everywhere and yes technically they are in the minority and frankly I don't give a rat's ***. The point is that you made several suppositions about muzzle flash and not being able to see **** in hypothetical shootouts that no ones ever been in. Here's a fact for you:

    My departments range is used by several departments. When I run range 80% of the course of fire is low light. Departments with ported guns have never had problems with multiple targets or target identification, burning their faces or whatever other hypothetical problem you can think of. You keep harping on loosing night vision when dude we work in the metro area around here and there is no night vision. Take a ported out, turn the lights down low but not off and see for your self.

    I don't care what other agencies do: didn't you'r mother ever use the analogy of jumping off a bridge...

    Bill Wilson was the biggest gamer of his time and he started the IDPA it was because he counldn't win anymore in IPSC.

    Dude, you can't follow an argument worth a crap dude . IMHO you need to take a basic logic or reasoning course dude .

    I'll stick with non-compensated handguns like the FBI, SEALs, SWAT teams, and other elite organizations use dude. Dude, you can stick with what those local Ohio PD's use. I'm sure they've done better testing and have more expertise than the aforementioned (that means mentioned previously, dude) agencies anyway. If that's analogous to jumping off a bridge because someone else did dude, then I'm over the edge already man.

    Over and out dude,

    Phoenix

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    i have a glock 22c and love it , i also had nightsights and an internal laser put on it.. its best gun i have ever used

    only drawback i can tell you is keeping the ports clean

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    I have to be honest and wonder if anyone posting speaking out against ported/compensated glocks have ever shot one or if they're simply regurgitating what they have "heard" about ported/compensated pistols from so-called "experts" My duty weapon is a Glock 21C. I recently did a night shoot and can't see how it would significantly affect your night vision any differently than a non-compensated. On newer Glocks the gasses come out in a "V" pattern instead of directly along the sight plane. So the muzzle flash coming out the end of a non-compensated barrel is any better??? Either way your night vision is going to be severy compromised if not destroyed by either one. I think everyone should shoot one for themselves before making assumptions about a decent weapon. Some may like it, some may not. As far as gasses buring your face off??? I just had to laugh out loud and throw the bulls#*t flag on that one. I've shot from the CAR (Center Axis Relock) position with my compensated Glock and haven't had my face burned off yet. Personally I think the recoil is less with the compensated, only slightly. But a slight difference may mean the difference in a quick follow up shot to stop the threat. Go out and shoot one for yourself...Don't listen to everyone elses opinions, go make your own.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by rookie2812
    I have to be honest and wonder if anyone posting speaking out against ported/compensated glocks have ever shot one or if they're simply regurgitating what they have "heard" about ported/compensated pistols from so-called "experts"
    My first Glock was compensated by Aro-Tek (that was before Glock started manufacturing them with compensated barrels.) Furthermore, every handgun course I taught included a demonstration with a Glock 22c during the night shoot. We shot both standard ball ammo and LE low flash ammo during the demonstration. Students were always amazed at how much vertical flash the compensated handgun produces. We affectionately called our 22c Mount Vesuvius.

    I also noted an interesting phenomenon during these. Nearly everyone who fired the 22c, including me, perceived the flash to be greater as an observer than as the shooter the weapon. This was true regardless of whether the observer stood to the side or to the rear of the shooter.

    While I cannot scientifically prove it, I suspect this is due to the immediate affect on the night vision of the shooter. Since the observer was always a few feet farther from away from the flash their eyes were less affected by it and they could actually see it better. Additionally, the shooter is focusing through the flash and concentrating on the target which further complicates the subjective observance of the flash on the part of the shooter. Therefore, I doubt that the shooter of a compensated handgun can objectively quantify the affect on their night vision simply by judging the perceived flash.

    I wish someone would do some slow motion photography of a shooters pupil while shooting compensated and non-compensated handguns. I suspect that would shed some light on the matter.

    Quote Originally Posted by rookie2812
    On newer Glocks the gasses come out in a "V" pattern instead of directly along the sight plane. So the muzzle flash coming out the end of a non-compensated barrel is any better??? Either way your night vision is going to be severy compromised if not destroyed by either one.
    The "V" pattern is still in front of your face. Sorry, but you are either kidding yourself, or you've never tested it yourself, if you believe the flash of a compensated and non-compensated handgun will affect your night vision the same. Simple logic applies here the greater the flash the greater the affect on your night vision and compensated handguns create more flash; period. We can legitimately debate whether the difference in flash is substantial enough to hinder you in a gunfight. But to deny that the flash is greater is being dishonest. Glock didn

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    After all that is anyone going to give up their compensated guns?

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    Quote Originally Posted by madic15al
    Bear in mind also that those hot gases will slap you good should you have to fire one in a guarded position. I've heard one person do this with a 357 sig caliber Glock 31 and peeled flesh back off of bone on his lower cheek firing it this way. I cannot verify this but those exhaust blast would hurt!
    Balderdash!!! (I'd like to use a different expletive beginning with "B," but this is a polite forum.)

    From a "guarded position," which I assume means just barely clear of the holster, my G22 duty weapon sprays only a little bit, easily bearable. If you don't care for it, simply cant the gun a little outboard (to the right for a right-handed shooter). Works like a charm.

    "Peeled flesh off of bone..." ???? I'm trying hard to imagine a circumstance where I would fire with the compensation port within even 10-12 inches of my face, and can't think of one.

    Muzzle flash from the compensation ports is also a non-issue with the right bullet in the gun. In addition, you should be looking through the "V" at your front sight. I notice a little, and I emphasize "little" flash-blinding when I use cheaper-than-dirt practice ammo in the dark. I have NEVER been bothered by it with duty ammo.

    The compensation causes the .40 G22 to recoil like the un-compensated 9mm G17. It does a great job at controlling muzzle flip and enabling reaquisition.
    "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit." - Aristotle

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    Compensated Glocks

    I co-instruct firearms at our local academy. Occasionally over the last couple of years we've had a cadet(s) report to school with a compensated Glock.

    At first we really believed these weapons were gonna' be trouble for low light shooting but . . .

    We use Federal ammunition, American Eagle, in 9mm, .40 and .45 ACP.

    The flash has been minimal in the .45 ACP and almost non-existent in the .40 and 9mm, being fired from the 17/22 and the 19/23.

    I was surprised.

    Old Dog

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