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Thread: Opinions of Reserve Police Officers...

  1. #1
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    Opinions of Reserve Police Officers...

    What is everyones opinon of Reserve Police Officers? Does sworn officers look down on them or what?
    In my opinion, they are still doing the same dangerous job as a sworn officer, the only difference I see is that the reserve officer doesnt get paid to get shot at. What does everyone on here think?
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  2. #2
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    It all depends on the particular reserve officers. I was a reserve for two years prior to becoming the real deal. I noticed that some reserves only did it so that they could get a badge and gun to look "cool", others couldn't pass an academy so this was the closest they could get to being an LEO.

    A few, myself included, used the position as a stepping stone and experience builder, into a certified position. And the others just wanted to give back to their community, but can not devote all their time to a full time position.

    All in all, I think reserves are great, they provide police services at minimal cost to a city/county and also give a lot back to the community. Its just a matter of weeding out the ones only in it for a badge and gun.

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    Here in ohio, it all depends on the particular officer and his dept. In some towns reserves (we call them auxilliary officers), are nothing more than extra manpower for the more less important jobs. They direct traffic for parades or constuction jobs. Answer lockouts, etc. Some are trained with the shotgun. Some don't even get that. On the other hand others are fully sworn officers and have full powers. Usually in smaller towns and such. All of our Aux are treated just like the regular officers, same uniforms, weapons, everything. But they have all been through the acadamy, fully trained. The former I think have little or no training. A guy I know who works for one of the east suburbs of Cleveland tells me that the auxillary officers in his dept are not allowed in certain areas of the station. In addition they have a lounge for officers to take breaks in, however the aux officers are barred from using it. In addition, their local rec center allows the regular officers free full use of their facility. Aux officers have to pay to join. Now that sucks

  4. #4
    The questor
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    well, isn't this timely.

    I just got a letter today asking me to come in for my oral boards to become a reserve officer for a local PD.

    This the same day I get the letter from the State police to come in and take the civil service exam.

    Civil service exam on Tuesday, oral boards on wendsday. Should be interesting.
    Though their numbers are many, as the grass upon the field, we will count them at the end of the day.

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    Reserves are and can be awesome to help take the BS paper. All of our reserves have been through the academy or went through the 3 levels of training....We have some officers who think down on reserves as if they are security guards...But our department hires mainly from the reserve force. So the later useually respect them. I know a lot of full time sworn that have a major ego ect.......We all bleed and die the same.....God bless the brotherhood......and the security guard...just kidding on the last....

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    Reserve Officers

    Depends on the department,the Reserve Program, and the individual Officers.Some departments have absolutely awesome reserve programs, and the Reserve Officer is held to the same recruiting/training standards as a full time Officer. LAPD is such an agency. I know of a couple Sheriff's Departments here in Alabama where the full time Deputies would have no off-days where it not for some part time, or Reserve Deputies. In the case of the latter, these are fully trained and certified Officers. They do make a difference.Alabama DPS has a Reserve Trooper Program, which I have posted on previously. These Officers are required to meet training requirements not those of a full-time Trooper. They are armed, and can exercise powers as Peace Officers while under the supervision of a full-time Trooper. They are unpaid, and must work 16 hours per month.

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    Totally depends on the department and state you live in. In Oregon there is a state mandated minimum training for a reserve officer, but most departments go beyond that.

    My department depends on their reserves and has a huge hiring rate of their reserves. PPB uses their reserves on a big scale and lets them go ride solo and take lower priority calls.

    Great stepping stone to full time, that is if your department and state look highly upon the reserves.
    Illegitimi non carborundum - Don't let the bastards grind you down.

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    I agree with everyone else here, if you do the same job you should be treated the same. Here in NJ most towns call aux guys class I or class II specials. SLEO II/SLEO I. Class two guys go through the same academy as the full timers and have full police power & carry but only on a part time gig. If you go through the 650 hours of SLEO II training alot of towns will waive you so you don't have to go back to the academy.

    Like a few other guys said this is a great stepping stone in a LE career.

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    In Memphis most of our reserves are higher paid buisiness men who want to be a Police Officer. Most are older and stay on because the city pays thier health insurance and pays them one dollar a year. Now I could go and start bashing our reserves like I want to, but I'll leave that alone. Lets just say I dont have much respect for the majority of them. Hell we had one so old he would ride around the fair on a "hovaround" no bull$hit!!

  10. #10
    Frank Booth
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    What is everyones opinon of Reserve Police Officers? Does sworn officers look down on them or what?
    In my opinion, they are still doing the same dangerous job as a sworn officer, the only difference I see is that the reserve officer doesnt get paid to get shot at. What does everyone on here think?
    Reserves do NOT do the same job as real police officers. Real police officers do the job for (at least) 40 hours a week and depend on the job to support their families. In order to do that for 25 years, they have to to deal with situations that no reserve has to put up with. That factor alone makes a night and day difference in real police officers vs. reserves. Real police officers put up with a hell of a lot more crap, both inside and outside of the police station, which causes a hell of a lot more stress, than any reserve has to deal with.

    The scab issue: If there is ONE police officer from a department who is layed off, and ONE reserve is working an event or patrol or whatever, the reserve is a SCAB! Nothing less. As far as I'm concerned, the same goes when you have 10 police officers and 10 reserves working an event. If a city can't find a way to hold an event safely with 10 police officers and no reserves, they shouldn't hold the event in the first place.

    This is my job and how I feed my family. I'd love to see how the UAW would react if a bunch of people walked into a union shop and started doing a union job for free one day a week.

    Currently, there are a couple hundred Detroit cops layed off. Lets see how many reserves are working the Superbowl this year for free and take a poll as to what they'd think of cops working for free at THEIR jobs if they were layed off and scrambling to find another way to support their families.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Booth
    Reserves do NOT do the same job as real police officers. Real police officers do the job for (at least) 40 hours a week and depend on the job to support their families. In order to do that for 25 years, they have to to deal with situations that no reserve has to put up with. That factor alone makes a night and day difference in real police officers vs. reserves. Real police officers put up with a hell of a lot more crap, both inside and outside of the police station, which causes a hell of a lot more stress, than any reserve has to deal with.

    The scab issue: If there is ONE police officer from a department who is layed off, and ONE reserve is working an event or patrol or whatever, the reserve is a SCAB! Nothing less. As far as I'm concerned, the same goes when you have 10 police officers and 10 reserves working an event. If a city can't find a way to hold an event safely with 10 police officers and no reserves, they shouldn't hold the event in the first place.

    This is my job and how I feed my family. I'd love to see how the UAW would react if a bunch of people walked into a union shop and started doing a union job for free one day a week.

    Currently, there are a couple hundred Detroit cops layed off. Lets see how many reserves are working the Superbowl this year for free and take a poll as to what they'd think of cops working for free at THEIR jobs if they were layed off and scrambling to find another way to support their families.
    Amen Brother!!

  12. #12
    R/SGT in Darkest Africa
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    I am sorry for you guys who dislike reservists, most of us are only there to help, there are those that are cowboys and they tend to give the rest of us a bad name.

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  13. #13
    Frank Booth
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    In SA there is a shortage of officers so we are helping to hold the line, very often having reservists work means the difference between having a response vehicle on the air to respond to complaints, patrol and do crime prevention.
    Sounds like South Africa needs to hire more cops.

    Function: noun
    1 : a worker who refuses to join a labor union
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    4 : one who works for less than union wages or on nonunion terms
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    Last edited by Frank Booth; 09-26-2005 at 06:36 AM.

  14. #14
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    Hi Frank

    True we do need to hire more cops, the state has increased the number of courses held per year to try and get more members into the service.

    We don
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  15. #15
    Frank Booth
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    My point was, no matter what you "see" while you're volunteering as a reserve, you're about as likely to experience the real police lifestyle and all that that entails from volunteering as a reserve as you are to learn what serving 25 years in the penitentiary is like by spending a couple days a month for 25 years in solitary confinement. Personally, I don't think I could handle the former, while I would consider the latter a vacation. Police reserves might look like police officers, but the similarities most often end there.

    [QUOTE]I don
    Last edited by Frank Booth; 09-26-2005 at 05:19 PM.

  16. #16
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    You are right, reserves are not going to get the same pressure as a full time officer. But maybe that is a good thing.

    The reservist is not going to be as uptight as a regular officer, but he may also be able to act as a valve to relieve some of that pressure. He is I am sure as vulnerable to the same threat of lawsuit if he makes a mistake. While he may not be fired from his regular job for hitting his wife, I am sure he will be removed from the force.

    This also may act to bring some outside support into the department. To many officers become familiar only with fellow officers and criminals. They get locked into a us vs them mentality with little or no relief. The reserve officer may be able to act as a bridge out of that trap, help the officer see that he needs to get away from the booze adn find a new outlet to release his frustrations.

    Reservist also lay their lives on the line, just as any officer does. He does so without pay that is true, but maybe that makes for an even more noble act. Of he gets injured on the job, is the city going to pay his family an income lost because he is no linger able to do his own job?

    Is he providing an essential service that his cash poor city cannot afford but needs? Is he here to get training and experience that will lead him into a permenant position?
    Though their numbers are many, as the grass upon the field, we will count them at the end of the day.

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    These guys are a HUGE help. When we page out at 3am for a traffic post in the pouring rain, some of these guys respond. And when they do respond, they respond with vigor and enthusiasm. I love them for that.

    On the other hand, some of them are severe wackers. These guys pull double duty as jolly vollys and reserves. They have their pov's loaded with blue lights and scanners. Ridiculous.

    But for every wacker, there's at least 2 good cover guys in there.

  18. #18
    Frank Booth
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    While he may not be fired from his regular job for hitting his wife, I am sure he will be removed from the force.
    You think that compares to what an officer will go through? The reserve can't volunteer to be the reserve police anymore but the cop loses his livelyhood? And do you think the resulting stress is anywhere near the same? "Kids, they kicked me off the reserves, I'll be home every Saturday now." Or, "Kids, I've been fired and will never again be able to be hired anywhere as a policeman. I'll be home every Saturday now..."

    The reserve officer may be able to act as a bridge out of that trap, help the officer see that he needs to get away from the booze adn find a new outlet to release his frustrations.
    You know what 9 out of 10 police reserves want to talk about when they're hanging around off-duty cops? Guns or "policework". You know what 9 out of 10 veteran cops DON'T want to talk about when they're hanging around the bar off-duty?

    Is he providing an essential service that his cash poor city cannot afford but needs? Is he here to get training and experience that will lead him into a permenant position?
    What do you do for a living?

    Reservist also lay their lives on the line, just as any officer does. He does so without pay that is true, but maybe that makes for an even more noble act.
    The department you volunteer with would dispatch you as the primary unit to an armed robbery in progress call?
    Last edited by Frank Booth; 09-26-2005 at 09:08 PM.

  19. #19
    R/SGT in Darkest Africa
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    Hi Frank

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  20. #20
    Battering Ram of Justice
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    I'm wondering what every non-police person here would think if someone showed-up at their place of employment, offering to cover a shift, for very short money, that would ordinarily be offered as overtime to the regular employees?

    How come there is no such thing as "Reserve DPW", or "Reserve Parks Department"?
    Talk sense to a fool, and he will call you foolish - Euripides

  21. #21
    R/SGT in Darkest Africa
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    You guys seem very hung up on this payment issue, we are not here to steal your jobs we are here to help. Most emergency services around the world have volunteers in fire, ambulance, police, sea rescue, mountain rescue depts etc

    For the most part a volunteer service is made up of dedicated individuals who only wish to help their fellow men and women, yes there are those who are cowboys and they should be properly restrained as they give the rest of us a bad name.

    True we can
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  22. #22
    Frank Booth
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    [QUOTE]At the moment The SAPS is still moving towards the goal of a representative police service and in order to do this preference is given to those members who were previously disadvantaged (I happen to be a pale male white, so I am low down on the list), while I can understand this I don

  23. #23
    Battering Ram of Justice
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rattel
    You guys seem very hung up on this payment issue, we are not here to steal your jobs we are here to help. Most emergency services around the world have volunteers in fire, ambulance, police, sea rescue, mountain rescue depts etc
    My point exactly.

    You only see "reserve", "auxiliary" or "special" titles when it comes to glory jobs like the police. If these volunteers truly want to help their fellow citizens, why don't they create the "DPW Reserve", to help fill pot-holes? That's a hugely important function of local government.

    Why not create the "Water & Sewer Auxiliary"? They can help the real Water & Sewer people clean catch-basins during big storms. Again, a hugely important function of local government.

    Why do these supposedely civic-minded people only want to spend their time playing cop? I think the answer is obvious.

    I ask again....what would you think if someone came to your place of employment, and offered to do your job for free/minimal pay, therefore depriving you of overtime?
    Talk sense to a fool, and he will call you foolish - Euripides

  24. #24
    R/SGT in Darkest Africa
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    Hi Delta784

    Well I don
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    Reserves

    The simple fact is that without reseves a lot of things would just not be done.
    The taxpayers are bleeding. You are not going to get money from them.
    So do you want a unpaid FD or no FD?
    Do you want a part time or unpaid cop or no cop?
    A boat patrol would be nice. But you have no money.
    A mounteted SAR team is nice. But you have no money.
    None of things would exist save for the kindness of strangers. And you are bashing them.
    I do not need this job. I have money. in fact, I spend my own oftentimes instead of screwing with the council.
    I am the chief LEO in my jursdiction. Reserves are not taking your jobs. There are no jobs. I would just have to make do with less.
    Actually, without reserve deputies, I would pull the pin.

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