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Thread: Decreasing 1.5 Mile Time - Pace?

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    Decreasing 1.5 Mile Time - Pace?

    As a 31 YO, I'm running a bit under an 8:00/mi pace for my 1.5 mile time. I'll usually get a time of around 11:45-11:55. I'm looking to get it sub 11:00. My issue is, I have a long stride, and I can run at a 7:00/mi pace easily, just not for 1.5 mile. I can keep it up for about 0.75 mile, then I start to slow down.

    Question is, I'd like to get my time under 11:00-11:15 in a month. Running 4 times a week. Should I focus on keeping that good stride and pace of 7:00/mile or under for as long as I can, slowly trying to increase my distance, or should I run 2-3 miles at an 8:00-9:00/mi pace and slowly try to increase my speed?

    I'm leaning towards keeping my pace, because from reading some running websites, they really push developing a good running form and stride. If I'm getting that right, I'd like to keep it, even if I can only go 1 mile and try to stretch from there. However, I don't want to screw myself here.

    Thoughts?

    Eventually I'd like to be able to run 3 miles at a 7:00 pace, or 5+ at a 8:00 pace. I can't see myself ever running more than 7 miles, unless I'm forced to. I personally get really bored running!

    Thanks all.

    Did a search, and didn't find an answer to exactly what I'm looking for here...

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    I can't run that fast, but what helped me was a treadmill. Start at 8:00 min pace for 1.5 at 0.5 or 1.0 incline. Each week increase the speed 0.1 or at whatever increment you can finish your run at. Personally the treadmill forces me to run at a certain pace, I found when I hit a certain distance I begin to slow down. If you keep the speed fixed on the treadmill you cannot do this and your time gradually improves overall. The incline is important because when running outdoors it is rarely a 0.0 incline. I linked below to a treadmill seed chart so you can see where you want to start and where you want to end up. Once you get to your goal for 1.5 mi. gradually increase distance at 1/4 mi each week until you get to your goal distance.

    http://www.surgicalartistrymarathon....pace-chart.htm
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    Google "fartlek training". It works.

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    I dont think you will find a definite answering seeing that peoples running styles are so differnt. I know for me I get a good steady pace and when I hit my last lap I kick up the pace. When I make the last turn on the track, I spring that last 100 yds. That will help with your time. The last time I ran the 1.5 mile it was well under 10 minutes so I can say this technique works.

    Just keep running and stay consistent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SHU View Post
    Google "fartlek training". It works.
    This seems to be what I was doing this week. Interestingly enough, I saw an improvement at CrossFit today in my endurance during the WOD.

    I think I'm going to alternate between the Fartlek training one day, a distance run the next (2-3 miles), 3-4 days a week. I'll let you know results... maybe it will help someone else. Thanks for the input all.

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    I did a lot of blend intervals in the 4 years I was in the DEA process (toward the end) and shaved 25seconds off my 2 mile in a month. My skinny *** lost 8 lbs that month too. It's high intensity so make sure you eat a lot. I googled 5k training and found that and some other stuff to keep me entertained because running bores me to death. Good luck!

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    ........................................
    Last edited by hahahasuckers; 10-24-2013 at 11:40 AM.

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    Fartleks are a good place to start. You might also consider running the Beep or Bleep test about four times each week. The longest you will probably run is about 10 or 11 minutes at a time but I guarantee your long distance times will go down.

    You can find it easily on Google, iTunes, or the Droid store.

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    Its all about how you train. I try and push myself harder and harder towards the end ( last .5) every time.

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    try interval training..thats what I do...it helps with your endurance...1 minute @ 5mph, 30 sec walk, 1 minute 5.5mph, 30 sec walk..(all on the treadmill of course so you can determine speed)

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    Run 1.5 as fast as you can, then continue on at a more comfortable pace for 3 miles.

    I always do 3 miles (my 1.5 is in lower 10 range now and keeps getting better), even if it's a bad day and I have to walk the rest of the way after 1.5. By setting the mark at 3 miles you are forced to "get it over-with" while continually progressing on the 1.5. This is less demotivating and keeps me running. I seriously hate running and this seems to work for me.
    Last edited by semper03; 12-04-2012 at 02:23 AM.
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    yess1976, I don't have a specific answer to your question, but I can tell you what I started doing 2 years ago, when I was 35 lbs heavier.

    For about 2-3 months, I ran every other day after work, starting with 7-8 minutes a day, up and down hills, and around track, listening to Megadeth. For me, it was trying a different route every other day, so I don't get bored. At first, it was hard, heavy breathing and all that stuff, but after forcing myself to go out and "suffer" for months, it started to get easy each time and I was able to increase the time that I was running.

    In between run days, I would do some weight traininig to help lose the wait, and eventually, after a year, I was able to run faster and at at 10:30 time for 1.5 miles. I think that was my best time, ever at 31 years old. I guess my point is to give it time and get out there regularely, and after a while, you will be able to do faster time.

    And congrats on quitting smoking too, that's never easy.
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    I will second the fartlek training. This is what I have been doing so far and it feels great!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ForzaMilan View Post
    I don't have a specific answer to your question, but I can tell you what I started doing 2 years ago, when I was 35 lbs heavier.

    For about 2-3 months, I ran every other day after work, starting with 7-8 minutes a day, up and down hills, and around track, listening to Megadeth. For me, it was trying a different route every other day, so I don't get bored. At first, it was hard, heavy breathing and all that stuff, but after forcing myself to go out and "suffer" for months, it started to get easy each time and I was able to increase the time that I was running.

    In between run days, I would do some weight traininig to help lose the wait, and eventually, after a year, I was able to run faster and at at 10:30 time for 1.5 miles. I think that was my best time, ever at 31 years old. I guess my point is to give it time and get out there regularely, and after a while, you will be able to do faster time.

    And congrats on quitting smoking too, that's never easy.
    Last edited by hahahasuckers; 10-24-2013 at 11:41 AM.

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    I'm 49, never ran in my life until a year ago after taking first civil service test for corrections. I stopped from july to early January, running now twice a week and its a struggle. My 1.5 was about 15:30, and last Wednesday ran my best at 14:30 with everything I had. I need 13:50 by Friday for a PAT. I had no idea I was getting a call, NYC Deputy Sheriff provisional.

    So, my question is should I run every day except the day before? I only had 1 week notice, and I was told to run no more than every other day. Thanks in advance, all advice appreciated - I need this job!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jager1147 View Post
    So, my question is should I run every day except the day before? I only had 1 week notice, and I was told to run no more than every other day. Thanks in advance, all advice appreciated - I need this job!
    You definitely want to taper off the workouts in intensity as you draw closer to your actual assessment. The day before should be a complete day of rest with a little more carbohydrates than normal, but you should not "carb load" by any means because you're not running for endurance. I took a test a few weeks ago and ran a 10:08 by tapering off and eating right.

    What I would do is start off on Monday with a form run for distance (2-3 miles), concentrating on my breathing and striking the ground with my forefoot. Follow that up on Tuesday with a 60/120, light sprint/jog type of deal for 20 minutes. Wednesday take an extremely light jog for form around the block a few times, keeping it right at or under a mile. Thursday is completely off. I would also refrain from going balls to the wall with any of these workouts. Don't burn yourself out. When that adrenaline hits and you show up at the complex, you'll shave some time off.

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    Thanks, makes sense and sounds like a good plan. I ran a 13:50 on a treadmill today at the gym (exact time needed). The treadmill always seems easier than the track and I need a little room to spare. A liitle snow outside and in the 20's, so it will be treadmill until the PAT on Friday. Thanks again, much appreciated.

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    Let us know how you do. Stay loose, stretch out, and I'm looking forward to your results.
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    The run portion of the agility was postponed from last Friday until tomorrow. Pushups and situps went fine. I ran Friday, did 3/4 mile yesterday (treadmill, blizzard here), and just stretching today. Thanks again, and I'll post when I pass!

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    The only way to decrease your time is to run more often. Little by little your time will decrease.

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    Fell short today, thanks all for the support - I'll simply be running more often. Time was abysmal. I'm honest with myself and know it would have had to have been a personal best, but my last run on the track was only 36 seconds short. Indoor runs are harder for sure.

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    A lot of people neglect speed work when they are training for the 1.5 mile run. After you get a solid base in start mixing in some interval work. One workout I like is the 6x400m with 1 minute rest. Lets say I was aiming for a 9:00m 1.5 mile run. I would set each 400 at a slightly faster pace (5:45 to 5:50 mile pace) and have at it. These types of workout teach the body how to maintain your desired pace.

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    I hope things go better for you next time. When I was preparing for that same run I did several different things. I don't know what will work for you, but I think intervals really helped me. I'd run at a steady pace then sprint for a while before going back to the original pace. If you're going to practice on a treadmill, put the incline at at least 3 degrees. Run several times a week. I've found that if I go 3 days without running I notice a significant decrease in ability. Sometimes, I set a particular pace and only decreased it if I significantly exceeded my maximum heart rate (I hit 195 once before I caught it). I decreased my run time from about 10:30 to my best time of under 8:30.

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    The interval training at least will keep it from being so monotonous, and I read about the fartlek training too which seems similar. The indoor run was at an indoor rugby field with cones placed in a rectangle at the perimiter. The distance was measured with the proctors Iphone, GPS function. He measured 1/10 mile, and calculated we do 18.75 laps. I'd swear it was a bit longer than 1.5 mile (as did the 2 guys who passed) , but I should have had a larger safety margin - I blame myself. My right calf is still sore for all the 90 degree turns at the corners lol. I'll be running 3 times a week, and mix in the interval training. Thanks for all the advice!

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    I've never understood that seeing as that is not a realistic 1.5 mile indicator of time with all of the turns. That sounds like it should be more an obstacle course to me. Why not just go to a straightaway on the road or a park somewhere?

    The "Couch to 5k" plan, as indicated in another thread, is a really good starting point to get into distance running. It's not so long a distance that a beginner after 6 weeks of balls to the wall training cannot run it in a decent time.

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