1. #1
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    Physical Agility Test Question

    I'm scheduled to take my first physical agility test with one of the local police departments around my home town. I am not worried about my push ups and sit ups, but I am worried about the mile and a half run. I am in decent physical shape, but I can't run to save my life. In fact, I could never run very fast in high school and I was a state wrestling champion. I am supposed to run a mile and a half in 12:30 which seems pretty week I know. But for some reason I seem to keep running the mile and a half in 14:30... Shy by two minutes. I feel like I am running as fast as I can. How does the agility test work? Do they time each person individually on the run? Or do you run with a large group of people all at the same time? Are they at all lenient about the run? Or is there someone counting your every move the entire time? I believe I am in decent physical shape but I can't run to save my life.

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    Depends on all of your answers. Typically, depending on the size of the group they will have you all start at the same time or in packs. Most agencies are not lenient on the run, but some are. Most of these PAT's are pass/fail so if you do run with a group try and pace someone in front of you. Were you given that time based on your age group? If so, then you might just lose points on the run and not get failed. Good luck.

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    Some of these tests will have a pace runner as well. If you run behind them, you will lose.
    "Naw officer, I was hanging with my cousin"

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikeymedic View Post
    Depends on all of your answers. Typically, depending on the size of the group they will have you all start at the same time or in packs. Most agencies are not lenient on the run, but some are. Most of these PAT's are pass/fail so if you do run with a group try and pace someone in front of you. Were you given that time based on your age group? If so, then you might just lose points on the run and not get failed. Good luck.
    Yeah, it was based around the 20-29 age group.

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    My run time is higher usually if I don't pace someone. Just run behind someone that seems to have a good pace and keep up.

  6. #6
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    +1 on the above answers

    Quote Originally Posted by sectionchamp06 View Post
    Are they at all lenient about the run?.
    They are not lenient..............They start the timer when the instructor stays "GO" and mark your time when you cross the finish line. If you meet the time required ----you pass. If you are too slow......you fail
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    1. When you practice, run 2-2.5 miles most days. Don't just run the 1.5 every time. It's not long enough to really change your fitness level. Once a week, try for 3.5-4 miles, without worrying about time.
    2. What's the problem: physical pain or windedness?
    3. Run every other day, not every day. Bike, swim, or do some other cardio in between; you'll hurt yourself if you run every day.
    4. Either run on a track or run the same route, so you can time yourself on smaller portions. I used to run on a track and check my time every half lap. One minute per half lap is 12 minutes, you're golden.
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    One word answer: Train. Take another look at School Cop's suggestions. OK, looks like you've got the endurance part pretty well nailed, now work on the speed. It's do able. Alabama has the 1.5 mile run as part of it's POST mandated entry level PAT. There is an allowance for age, but it's a tightly run test across the board.

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    Like School Cop says, run longer distances at a slower pace. When I was training for a 1.5 mile test I ran 3-4 miles three or four days a week. When I was running the first 1.5 miles in under the time limit I knew I was good to go. My test had a 15 minute limit, I came in at 11. Endurance is built up over time. Running 1.5 miles feels like a piece of cake when you have been training at three miles.
    I was never a strong runner, I could bust out a mile or so but never much more. I started training for the longer runs when I was 32 years old. I was shocked how much I enjoyed it and how my distance increased with time. It is something you gain slowly and lose quickly, even more so then weight training. As least for me.

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    Better get out there and build up your speed and stamina.

    I don't know about the academy to which you may be sent, but I know that in the ones we use the recruits run every day, and they get fit tested every week.

    Fail to make time on a run and you are out, so you had better get it into gear if you know you are weak in that area.
    Looking for a career in police work? Contact us at policeapplicant (at) hyattsville (dot) org

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    Check out the "Health and Fitness" section for a lot of useful running tips. Lots of people have the same issue as you.

    On your last lap remember that this is your dream job, and if you puke or can't walk for a day it's worth it to beat the time. Then imagine one of your police officer friends getting their face stomped in and remember that you'll be the one that needs to help them. That cuts some time off of my pace.

  12. #12
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    It's really pretty simple, RUN FASTER, so you want the job or not. I once did a 20 mile force march with a 60lbs ruck sack because I wanted to be on the bases Emergency Services Team (EST = Air Force SWAT TEAM). You either have the intestinal fortitude or not. I'm not known for sugar coating things if you can't tell.

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    Also, do several wind sprints at various lengths and speeds. You will see that even when you are winded, you can continue to sprint.

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    ftttu had a good suggestion. Keep up your regular 2.0-2.5 daily runs. Once or twice a week find a place to run a sprint course where you sprint for several yards then jog for several yards. This builds up endurance fairly quickly. It's basically interval training. Google that and you will find answers to building up your endurance.

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    If you can run on your own and get within 20-30 seconds of the time, I'm sure the run on PT day will encourage you enough to run faster. When we ran at my PT day they divided us into two groups. Each person had a number and as we completed a lap, officers helping with the PT would put a mark on our sheet. Each lap they would tell us our time.

    If you can listen to music, listen to it. When I jog I listen to music which takes away the sound of me running and my breathing. I then focus on the words of the music. Also, on PT day ask around... find people that run under the time needed to pass. During the run, try to keep up with them.

    At the end of the day, that run is the gate to your career. If you aren't sure you can make it, and this is something you honestly want to do, you better give it your all and be near the point of needing an ambulance by the time you finish that run.

    Like others have said, run at least 3 miles each day you run. Get a stopwatch and time yourself. Run the same route each time and force yourself to run the beginning faster and faster.

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