1. #1
    jamesnj
    Guest

    Shuffle Steering

    I was just told about a steering technique that officers are taught called "shuffle steering". Is that really common or just something you guys do in emergencies?
    Thanks for putting up with my stupid questions

  2. #2
    Dukeboy01
    Guest
    Learned how to do it in the academy in order to pass the driving test. Haven't used it since.

  3. #3
    Don
    Guest
    I was taught this in a driving course that I took for a private company not too long out of high school! The academy also taught this. I've used it so long it is just second nature now.

    The exception to that is a few vehicles that I have driven over the years that had the (unadjustable) steering wheel positioned too low for comfort with driving this way.



    ------------------
    "We're sorry, the number you have dialed, 911, is no longer in service. This is a recording. . ."
    6P1 (retired)

  4. #4
    cajuncop
    Guest
    Shuffle steering is really a good technique that I was thought while in the academy. However, it has no place when you're in a pursuit trying to talk on the radio and drive. I do good to keep one hand on the wheel.

    ------------------
    Without the support of our fellow officers, sometimes we have no support at all.

  5. #5
    Don
    Guest
    Aw come on cajun, admit it. If you would put the cup of coffee and the cigar down, you could run the pursuit and call it on the radio MUCH easier!

    ------------------
    "We're sorry, the number you have dialed, 911, is no longer in service. This is a recording. . ."
    6P1 (retired)

  6. #6
    Sig220Man
    Guest
    Shuffle steering is taught for the following reasons:

    1. Unlike with hand-over-hand steering, with shuffle steering you never have to take a hand fully off the wheel; you only release your grip slightly on one hand or the other.

    2. If you use the hand-over-hand technique and try to hold a radio mike at the same time, you will eventually wrap the mike cord around the steering column. Not a good thing when you're in a pursuit.

    3. Shuffle steering keeps your arms as far as possible from being directly over the front of the steering wheel, very important now that cars come standard with airbags.

    I'm surprised to hear officers on this forum say that they don't follow this technique out of the academy. I use shuffle steering faithfully, both on-duty and in my personal vehicle.

  7. #7
    Red5
    Guest
    I agree with Sig220, it takes a while to get used to shuffle steer, I was taught in racing school when I first started racing on the weekends (on a track of course!).It took some getting used to, mainly I began using the shuffle steer technique on my "POV" when I was off the track too which made me more profcient and comfortable with it too.

    I also volunteer at a rescue squad, and for their "EVOC" (Emergancy Vehicle Operators Course) they teach shuffle steer too. I am an avid user of the technique and won't release any new probationary rescue tech. who doesn't use it while driving.

    If I can use the shuffle steer while responding "code" in a 4 ton rescue aparatus, use the mic, play with the wig-wags, and the yelp button, I am sure I will be able to use shuffle steer in the academy and if Im ever in a persuit.

    Of course if any of you fine gentleman/ladies are my FTO when I get out of the academy in Oct. you are COMPLETELY RIGHT... shuffle steer is for wussies

  8. #8
    colinm
    Guest
    'shuffle steering' in the UK was popular and taught by police driving schools throughout the 60's, 70's and 80's, locally known as 'holding the 10-2 position'. I'm not so sure as to it's value today with power steering as it tends to encourage 'oversteering' and possible skidding.

  9. #9
    Don
    Guest
    colin,

    Try the 4-8 instead of the 10-2. It cuts way down on the oversteering. And no, I don't know why, just that it works for me.

    ------------------
    "We're sorry, the number you have dialed, 911, is no longer in service. This is a recording. . ."
    6P1 (retired)

  10. #10
    colinm
    Guest
    Don,
    I agree with with you 8-4 is the most natural position, however my last police advanced driving course was 1978, driving a 4.2ltr Jaguar........a very nice motor! I suppose almost anything goes these days so long as you get from A to B safely and with progress.

    colin.

  11. #11
    unhappycop
    Guest
    I was taught PULL-PUSH steering at the academy and have found it invaluable, especially in high speed pursuit situations, or when single unit. I have been in a number of pursuits where I have called and driven (with newbies in the passenger seat etc ), and it is VERY difficult using overhand technique and much easier using pull-push.

    If used correctly the term "Shuffle steering" is not really appropriate. If you are "Shuffling" you aren't doing it right.

    If used correctly you should have both hands at the SAME height on opposite sides of the wheel with steering in each direction made in one smooth motion.

    Obviously, you can not tell others how to suck eggs, but I have found the pull-push much better. And believe me, I was taught to drive civilian vehicles overhand and was VERY sceptical at first. You just have to knuckle down and practice it to get it right.

    ------------------
    The harder I work, the luckier I get...

    [This message has been edited by unhappycop (edited 04-03-2001).]

  12. #12
    Sig220Man
    Guest
    Originally posted by unhappycop:
    I was taught PULL-PUSH steering at the academy and have found it invaluable, especially in high speed pursuit situations, or when single unit...If used correctly the term "Shuffle steering" is not really appropriate. If you are "Shuffling" you aren't doing it right.
    Where I went to EVOC, the instructors told us that the terms "shuffle steering" and "push-pull steering" meant the same thing.



  13. #13
    unhappycop
    Guest
    I guess departmental terminology aside, if you're "shuffling" your hands around the wheel, it's not really the same thing, and that's what I (like most people) did when I was learning the technique. It is only when you become halfway proficient that the "shuffling" part stops. Until this occurs it DOES seem like a less effective was of steering a vehicle (at higher speeds, with radio and other distractions considered).

    I was merely saying that "shuffle-steering" isn't really an accurate represntation of what it really is, but if some trainers use that term, good on them.

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