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  1. #1
    jketcham21
    Guest

    Post Buying Police Badges

    About a year ago I came across http://www.policebadges.com/ in which you can purchase badges and have them customized with what you want on it.

    So I thought what the heck and put in an order and I, being just a regular citizen, was able to get a badge customized to have the city's police department, in which I live in, engraved on.

    The badge quality is just as good as that of a real badge, in fact you can't tell a difference between it and a real badge.

    Since then I took the clip off, mounted it into a nice frame creating a cool little plauqe. I know the chief here in town, so I thought when he retires I would give it to him as a gift as he gave me a patch when I left my last job.

    So my question is, how are the allowed to do this? Wouldn't something like that be illegal cause anyone could easily get a badge and with the right know-how could get everything needed to portray a law enforcer.

    What are the laws in your area's in regards to something like this? Do you consider it illegal for someone to have a real like, or a real badge for collecting purposes only?

  2. #2
    Don
    Guest

    Post

    This is just my recollection with a memory that isn't too great. . .

    However, I don't believe there is a problem with having a badge collection. HOWEVER, if you were to be carrying the badge, then you'd best have the ID card that goes with it. Otherwise both "the badge and the body" will be subject to being "seized."

    I'd be willing to bet you could do a little research on this by checking your state laws through the Kansas website.

  3. #3
    Scott H. Bennett
    Guest

    Post

    I think the owner of that company or one like it has had some legal troubles recently. I saw a piece on Dateline, 20/20, or one of the other news shows about a company selling fake badges on-line. It had to do with primarily fake NYPD badges but he sold many others. I think the Postal Inspectors or somebody locked him up, but he was out on bond still running his business.

  4. #4
    3/4s
    Guest

    Post

    quote:
    Originally posted by Groundhog:
    I think the owner of that company or one like it has had some legal troubles recently. I saw a piece on Dateline, 20/20, or one of the other news shows about a company selling fake badges on-line. It had to do with primarily fake NYPD badges but he sold many others. I think the Postal Inspectors or somebody locked him up, but he was out on bond still running his business.

    I saw that too. I don`t know the outcome but IAD locked up a NYPD Lt. for selling badges on EBAY a few years ago. EBAY now says something like it has to be a "replica" or some such.

    I can buy a dupe of my old shield in a lot of places in N.Y.C. but I have to show my I.D. card. People will pay a fortune for a "real" badge but most don`t even know what they look like.

    Without an I.D. card a badge or shield is useless. I can show any cop on this board my shield but how would they know unless the I.D. card is with it?

    Basically I think Don`s correct about collecting.

  5. #5
    PatrickM98
    Guest

    Post

    The only badges that it is illegal to possess (at least under federal law) are those of federal agencies. Defunct or special issue badges (such as inauguration or millennium) are exempt.

    Federal law also prohibits the transfer or receipt of 'counterfeit' badges through interstate commerce, although there is an exception in the law for collectors. Obviously, it's illegal to use any badge, counterfeit or real, to commit a crime.

    I'm just familiar with those two federal laws, but some states may have their own laws restricting badges. There actually was a bill introduced several years ago by a congressman proposing the banning of police badge and patch shipping through the mail, although that didn't make it past committee.

    [ 04-25-2003, 11:15 PM: Message edited by: PatrickM98 ]

  6. #6
    IPDBrad
    Guest

    Post

    That is surprising. To get my second badge, I had to have dept letterhead go to the one shop in town that makes them and show ID.

    You can't even buy shoulder patches without ID. When I was in NYC after 911, seemed like every souvenir shop was selling NYPD shoulder patches.

    I think the poster hit the nail on the head when they said: Not against the law to possess, it is misuse that will get you.

  7. #7
    JKT
    Guest

    Post

    Badges can be ordered from a number of places, but most, that I've seen, require at least a letterhead.

    Although I'm sure there are places that don't.

  8. #8
    PatrickM98
    Guest

    Post

    quote:
    Originally posted by IPDBrad:
    That is surprising. To get my second badge, I had to have dept letterhead go to the one shop in town that makes them and show ID.

    You can't even buy shoulder patches without ID. When I was in NYC after 911, seemed like every souvenir shop was selling NYPD shoulder patches.

    There is one site on the internet that is basically the Ebay of the police badge hobby. I've seen numerous IPD badges on it over time, as well as badges from MANY other agencies...all sold to the highest bidder. As to the patches, anyone can buy them on Ebay.

    It would be pretty easy for someone to put together an authentic police uniform if they so desired and knew where to look. Not too comforting.

  9. #9
    Turner
    Guest

    Unhappy

    Yeah, here a few years back there was a guy going around as a police officer pulling women over with flashing blue lights in his car. Those women were then raped. [Frown]

    [ 04-26-2003, 11:41 PM: Message edited by: Turner ]

  10. #10
    mountaineermanhunter
    Guest

    Question

    did they ever catch the guy who was doing that? my sister lived in Knoxville where this was happening and made me a little uneasy.

  11. #11
    Turner
    Guest

    Post

    I honestly can't remember. However I haven't heard anything about him for a while so he was either catched or he moved on. Sorry that I couldn't have been of more help.

  12. #12
    Sleuth
    Guest

    Post

    In most states, posession is legal, the crime is impersonating an Police Officer.

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