1. #1
    Forum Member
    Peachy C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    21

    Montana police officer shoots and kills fleeing suspect who tried to kill him (video)

    Hamilton Police shooting video

    This is Hamilton, MT Ofc. Ross Jessop stopping a vehicle that had driven through a turn-only lane. Listen carefully- there is an audible "click" as the criminal's gun is pointed directly at Jessop's head. Lucky...
    "...the one and only success which it is his to command is to bring to his work a mighty heart." - Oliver Wendell Holmes

  2. #2
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    29

    Very Lucky!

    Its scenarios like this that make me second guess wanting to be a cop. this and the woodbury shooting. Im an explorer for the dept, and i just hope this training and skills can save my life in a situation like this.


    Prayers...

  3. #3
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    238
    Quote Originally Posted by Peachy C View Post
    Hamilton Police shooting video

    This is Hamilton, MT Ofc. Ross Jessop stopping a vehicle that had driven through a turn-only lane. Listen carefully- there is an audible "click" as the criminal's gun is pointed directly at Jessop's head. Lucky...
    Nice job Officer Jessop... I wish the media would strike the phrase "routine traffic stop" from their dialog. There is no such thing as a "routine" traffic stop, as the above illustrates.

  4. #4
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    East Metro, MN
    Posts
    143
    I saw this the other night. A good training video. Makes me conscious about not getting too far forward in the window on stops. And not holding my flashlight with gun hand. Glad the officer was ok!

  5. #5
    Police Officer

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Elko New Market, Minnesota
    Posts
    690
    Just reminds you that no matter what the call you have to be ready for anything. Thank god the gun didn't go off the first time or this could have been a completely different story.
    "We Train to Fight, We Fight to Win, We Win to Survive, We Survive to LIVE!"

    The views expressed in the above post are the sole opinion of the author and do not reflect any official position by the author's employer and/or municipality.

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    MCSD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    709
    Awesome, so glad to see this officers reactions to the weapon then he handled business. PLEASE KEEP YOUR FLASHLIGHT IN YOUR NON-WEAPON HAND!!!
    Law Enforcement Officers Equity Act (H.R. 1362)
    Sign this petition that will change the retirement benefits for federal police officers currently not covered. No registration required.

  7. #7
    Infantryman
    yangsTa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    957
    Did you notice who he called? Called another sqaud that shots were fired. Why not let dispatch know first?

  8. #8
    Gopher Fan!

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    North
    Posts
    1,841
    Quote Originally Posted by yangsTa View Post
    Did you notice who he called? Called another sqaud that shots were fired. Why not let dispatch know first?
    Some departments use a number to indicate dispatch. For example, if a department's call numbers were at 2700-2799, 2700 might be the call number for dispatch.

  9. #9
    Infantryman
    yangsTa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    957
    Quote Originally Posted by Buck Eight View Post
    The guy just had someone put a gun in his face and pull the trigger and fired his own weapon 14 times. Let's not get too technical in our critique.
    Not really critiquing.. just curious.

  10. #10
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    East Metro, MN
    Posts
    143
    Quote Originally Posted by yangsTa View Post
    Did you notice who he called? Called another sqaud that shots were fired. Why not let dispatch know first?
    I guess you have never dealt with dispatch before.

    I did like in the video when he says "shots fired.....and he just crashed into a light pole."

  11. #11
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    11
    I think the officer did a fantastic job. He's alive today and went home to his family and he took care of the threat. Sometimes you guys are too critical on here. A lot of units when they call the dispatcher will call their own unit/squad number...and that is what he did...you hear the dispatcher repeat two of his last call numbers...he was also incredibly calm after the shooting...I can say from personal experience, when you are involved in a shooting, lots of things happen, and you remember about a tenth of them. I'm sure if you asked him he wouldn't be able to tell you how many times he fired his weapon, or why he was holding his flashlight in his weapon hand, or why he was standing in the kill zone. But with that said I'm glad he made it home at the end of his tour.

  12. #12
    Delta Response

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    AZ (MN Native)
    Posts
    153
    Quote Originally Posted by crimefighter177 View Post
    A lot of units when they call the dispatcher will call their own unit/squad number...and that is what he did...
    That's correct, the units I dispatch for will either just give their number, for example: "200", or will state "200 County" or "100 Headquarters" depending on the department. Either way is acceptable and will be acknowledged by dispatch.

    He was very calm, I know officers that I dispatch that scream out of control if they simply spot a fight in progress down the block. He did a great job!

  13. #13
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    St Marys County, MD
    Posts
    537
    Quote Originally Posted by crimefighter177 View Post
    I think the officer did a fantastic job. He's alive today and went home to his family and he took care of the threat. Sometimes you guys are too critical on here. A lot of units when they call the dispatcher will call their own unit/squad number...and that is what he did...you hear the dispatcher repeat two of his last call numbers...he was also incredibly calm after the shooting...I can say from personal experience, when you are involved in a shooting, lots of things happen, and you remember about a tenth of them. I'm sure if you asked him he wouldn't be able to tell you how many times he fired his weapon, or why he was holding his flashlight in his weapon hand, or why he was standing in the kill zone. But with that said I'm glad he made it home at the end of his tour.

    See, I view this differently, not as criticism, but more as incident analysis. We in aviation do the same thing, picking apart an incident, trying to find possible ways it could have been handled better. This officer went home, and that's the golden ring for him. Good for him. Now, what can you all learn from this that lets the next guy go home? You all know better than I, so put your thinking caps on, not to criticize him, but to help the next guy.

    What can an officer in a similar situation do better? To either prevent the bad guy from getting his weapon into play, or reacting once that's happened? Not that he did bad, dont mistake me, but there's always room to do better.

  14. #14
    Forum Member
    Peachy C's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    21
    This is a scary, very useful video because it shows that this kind of situation can happen to anyone.

    Jessop is clearly an officer who knows what he's doing- he's able to control himself, to prioritize quickly, and to act decisively. The scary thing is the complacence- and you really can't fault him for it. It's clear that Jessop thought the driver was drunk, and he probably was. I guess that's why Jessop stood forward of the door frame, turned his head away from the driver, and held his flashlight in his strong hand. On 99.9% of the stops in which you deal with drunks, you can get away with this, but this stop was in the .1%.

    If that *******'s weapon hadn't double-fed or if the round had been chambered properly or whatever malfunction it was hadn't happened, Jessop would be dead. Jessop probably thought he knew exactly what was going on, because he's a good cop who pays attention. I'll bet he was right about almost everything except for the gun... and there's no way he could have known about the gun.

    Jessop was too comfortable- this was probably just another DWI. I don't care who you are, everyone does this: you deal with a particular kind of problem or person regularly, and it becomes familiar and easy. That's fine in most jobs, but the unexpected variable in this job can kill you. It's cliched as hell, but the lesson of this video is that anyone can kill or hurt you, and you need to believe that every time you make contact with someone.
    "...the one and only success which it is his to command is to bring to his work a mighty heart." - Oliver Wendell Holmes

  15. #15
    Waingro...where is he?
    Narco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Georgia (Metro-ATL)
    Posts
    3,248
    another good argument for passenger side approach
    Perseverate In Pugna

  16. #16
    Forum Member
    tdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    59
    I am not picking on anyone here, I can't stand reading comments about critique peoples mistakes or "I would have done this" on the field in scenarios like this.

    I would like you to show me how you would have done it "better". After years on the job, we can loose a sense of "readyness" if I am writing that the correct way. Officers in the field have less than a second to make their decisions in scenarios like this, and "we" get to take all week and "critique" what things the officer did wrong.

    Maybe I'm just sour about the Maplewood officer killed, but we learn from others mistakes. Lets keep it professional.

  17. #17
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    New YORK
    Posts
    89
    Do it differently? Listen the officer had a dirtbag put a gun to his face and fired at once, no questioned asked he had every justification to shoot until the subject was no longer a threat. He went home safe and let this situation be a training experience to the rest of the law enforcement community in some way. God bless everyone and angels were looking over Officer Jessop that night. I personally think he did a great job and clearly showed he can handle himself in the most extreme situation. Routine traffic stop, RIGHT!!!!!
    Should of read "LOOSER PULLS GUN ON OFFICER".

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Click here to log in or register