1. #1
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    FTO's, what do you expect?

    Just curious on what you expect (what you expect him/her to do, and what you expect him to know) of the new officer during the duration of his field training.

    Day 1
    Week 1
    Week 2
    Week 3
    So on and so forth.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    General Academy knowledge and I expect the turds to ask questions. I should be tired of hearing their voice at the end of every shift because they would not stop asking questions. Granted there is such a thing as dumb question. By week 4 they answer their own questions. By week 11 I am a rider, there to make sure he or she does not step on his or her dingaling.
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    That you stay awake, off the cell phone with your significant other except for emergent calls...

    I usually start with a demo, this is how I do a traffic stop, after they watch one, then I say ok you do it... then we talk... etc.

  4. #4
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    My job is to take what the academy taught the rookie and teach them how to apply it in a real world environment. I start with very low expectations, but from Day 1. They need to have a general knowledge of the penal code, code of criminal procedure, transportation code, and general orders. They cover all that in the academy. They also need to be able to read and write english at least well enough that spell check can give them the correct spelling on words they use.

    Training moves at the rookies pace, which usually is slow. The first thing I always tell my rookies is that if they aren't asking questions, it's because they know what they are doing. There's no set time, where I say it's week X, rookie fails, it's after repeated exposure to the same type of incident and the rookie just can't perfom that I start hammering them on their daily observation reports. We (the rookie and I) analyze their performance on everything they do. I make sure they are very aware of areas they need to improve their performance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Irishluck31 View Post
    General Academy knowledge and I expect the turds to ask questions. I should be tired of hearing their voice at the end of every shift because they would not stop asking questions. Granted there is such a thing as dumb question. By week 4 they answer their own questions. By week 11 I am a rider, there to make sure he or she does not step on his or her dingaling.
    This may not be the best place for this story but I can't resist. Your statement of there actually being a dumb question reminded me of it. When I was in the academy we had a course on death investigations. At the end it was opened up for questions. One of my classmates asked the following question. "Is it true that you can look in the eyes of someone who is dead and see the last thing they saw before they died?" Everyone in the class kind of looked at each other wondering if he was joking, unfortunately he was not joking. The instructor did a good job of not making fun of him and basically said no and moved on. The student definitely did not live it down though.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod_Farva View Post
    This may not be the best place for this story but I can't resist. Your statement of there actually being a dumb question reminded me of it. When I was in the academy we had a course on death investigations. At the end it was opened up for questions. One of my classmates asked the following question. "Is it true that you can look in the eyes of someone who is dead and see the last thing they saw before they died?" Everyone in the class kind of looked at each other wondering if he was joking, unfortunately he was not joking. The instructor did a good job of not making fun of him and basically said no and moved on. The student definitely did not live it down though.
    Funny... I thought "Are you sure Marijuana is still illegal?" was dumb.
    It takes a Wolf.......

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    Quote Originally Posted by Irishluck31 View Post
    Funny... I thought "Are you sure Marijuana is still illegal?" was dumb.
    the best is when I'm patting somebody down and I ask do you have any guns or drugs on you. They reply nah no guns or drugs, but I have a little weed in my pocket.

  8. #8
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    We have our FTO program broken down into phases, with specific tasks to be learned in each. But general, it works like this:

    Phase 1: You get shown how to doo things properly, at least the first time.

    Phase 2: You perform the job, with minimal input from FTO.

    Phase 3: You perfrom the job with no input from the FTO, and he evaluates how you did. During this phase, the FTO should intervene only if it is needed for legal, moral, or safety reassons.
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    As stated, I like it when new agents ask intelligent questions. It shows interest and enthusiam for the job. There are few things worse than a new agent who is already acting like a saltbox, complaining about stupid crap like vehicles and equipment and not interested in working. This is the stage of your career where you should be excited about the job, coming in early, leaving late, volunteering for stuff, etc.
    Before science, it was believed that autumn was caused by Chuck Norris simultaneously roundhouse kicking every tree on the planet.

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    As an FTO one of my biggest pet peeves is when a trainee will not admit they have a problem with something. FTOs arent psychics. If you don't understand something, let your FTO know. As far as I know, Ive never had a trainee that was a "born cop" whether they thought they were or not.
    This may be department specific, but I NEVER allow trainees to call me "Sir".
    Reason is, when your on a call, I want you to handle it. As soon as you look at me in front of your victim and call me "Sir" your victim instantly realizes that I am the guy in charge and they start talking to me the FTO, not you the trainee. Again, your FTO may want you to, but that is my reason for not doing it.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mp1161 View Post
    Just curious on what you expect (what you expect him/her to do, and what you expect him to know) of the new officer during the duration of his field training.

    Day 1
    Week 1
    Week 2
    Week 3
    So on and so forth.

    Thanks in advance.
    It's been a while since I was an FTO, but what I expected was you, as the rookie, to do your job, be respectful to senior members, be early for work, spit shined, shaved, polished, and ready to do battle. That starts at day one, and goes through your entire career.

    I expect a positive attitude, no matter how much I complain about the job. You have not been on long enough to complain, so just listen and agree.

    When you have a question, ask it, but listen to the answer. Write it down if you have a bad memory. Never, ever, ask the same question twice. FTOs do not like to repeat themselves.

    When you do a report, any report, proof read it. Stupid mistakes are stupid, and reflect on your attention to detail.

    Never, ever, lie to your FTO, no matter what. Always, tell the truth, in your reports, and in your answers.

    If there is a problem of a personal nature, address it. That goes for everything. Be straight with your FTO, and he or she will be straight with you.

    If and when it's time to go "hands on", you had better be right in the thick of things. As an example, during MY rookie experience, my FTO and I were doing interviews at a large drinking party. A guy came up and cocked his arm back like he was going to strike my FTO. He never got the chance, as I was on him and the party had begun. My FTO was impressed. Always take care of your FTO. Know your use of force policy, and never be afraid to use force when it is needed.

    We expect you to read. Get some old reports and see how it's done. Make up a "sample" book of reports to help you get things right. Knowledge is power on our job. Make sure you know the laws, but, on top of that, make sure you know rights, and what they are. (Hint-they are not to be confused with your "authority".) Civil lawsuits can ruin your life and career. I've seen it first hand with some really good officers. If you know where the line is, you will never cross it. If you don't know... Where knowledge is power, ignorance is no excuse.

    Hope all that helps, GROG
    As far as "rights" are concerned; I look at them this way... I don't tell you what church to go to, and you don't tell me what kind of firearm I can own...

  12. #12
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    -Show up early, have all your gear ready before the shift begins, and be ready to work nonstop for the entire shift.
    -Pay attention. Listen and think to what I tell you, what other deputies say, what the sergeant says, what witnesses tell you, what dispatch broadcasts.
    -Understand that you are going to be drinking from a firehose for five months. Your entire life will revolve around work. Make adjustments for your personal life, because field training is a lot harder than the academy, and you will be through if you are not 100% dedicated.
    -No shortcuts. Do it the right way, by the book, every time.
    -If you don't know, find the answer. You need to be able to operate independently - that is what you are being trained to do - so try and find the answer on your own. If that doesn't work, then ask. Never go away not knowing because you were hesitant to find out.
    -Be nosy. When you are at a call or talking to someone on a stop, if you want to know something, no matter how arcane or irrelevant, ask.
    -Don't give breaks because you want to feel accepted by some mope or because you felt sorry for someone. That phase of your life is over. Do your job.
    -Never, never, never use anything less than 100% proper, by the book, officer safety tactics at all times, on all contacts, in all situations, with all people. There is no exception to this rule. It will keep you alive for the next 30 years.
    -You aren't experienced, so you do not blow off making a car stop because the occupants didn't look like crooks to you.
    -Do not rationalize.
    -If you are having some issue, or think that a particular training technique would work better for your learning style, tell us. Field training won't work if you aren't being trained in a way that you will understand the information.
    -One of the best ways to master something is through repetition, so do everything a lot. That means stop every traffic violator you observe, make lots of ped stops, take lots of reports.
    -100% effort 100% of the time.
    -Keep your physical fitness up, because that is a key to stress reduction.
    Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. - Ronald Reagan

    I don't think It'll happen in the US because we don't trust our government. We are a country of skeptics, raised by skeptics, founded by skeptics. - Amaroq

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