1. #1
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    need advice: barrels for Glock pistols

    I own a Glock 19 pistol and I have been considering buying a few new parts for it ( see my other post on recoil kits ). One of these parts has been a new aftermarket barrel.

    I have never heard any complaints against the factory Glock barrels. However, I have heard several shooters claim that the aftermarket alternatives are far superior. Has anybody ever used an aftermarket barrel on a Glock? If so, how did you like it?

    If the aftermarket alternatives are as good as the claims, then I am all for buying one. However, I do not want to sacrifice the quality that Glock pieces are constructed with.

  2. #2
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    What are you looking for out of your Glock? Plinking, work, competition?
    The comments made herein are those solely of author and in no way reflect the opinions of any other person, agency or other entity.

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    I left a post on your recoil question and then saw this post. Sounds to me like you are considering tricking out your Glock. Of course, once you do that, you will not want to carry this gun for duty or concealment. Except for their extended/competition guns, Glocks are not made with the inherent accuracy expected from a top competition gun. They are designed primarily for the military (not ours) and law enforcement, and they are designed to keep costs down so they have a lot of inter-changeability, and they all do well within those specifications. But they will not meet the requirements of a serious competitor. That's why Glock designed the GSSF. They had to have a competition where Glock owners could win in.

    Yes, I've put a couple different barrels on my Glocks. A word of warning here. BEWARE of anyone who tells you their barrels are MATCH GRADE and are drop in, no gunsmithing required. NOT. A true match grade barrel is custom fit to your gun.

    However, there are some benefits to going with aftermarket barrels. Generally speaking aftermarket barrels are more accurate than Glock factory. Partly due to the type of rifling, crown, polished feed ramp, and the fact that tolerances will be tighter on an aftermarket barrel. Probably the number one reason for going with an aftermarket barrel is the fact that you can shoot lead with most of them, whereas lead and Glock factory barrels do not go well together. In competition, lead bullets are a lot cheaper to make than jacketed bullets are, and if you're a serious competitor, you're going to shoot a lot. Jacketed bullets get expensive real fast when your shooting upwards of 1,000 rounds a week.

    Having said all that, there are some fine barrels on the market, such as Lone Wolf (probably the cheapest and runs about $100), KKM (a good barrel that runs about $175), etc. The best barrel I've ever used is the Bar-Sto barrels (they've been number 1 in after market barrels for over 30 years. A cheap on will run about $200), but they are not drop in barrels, they do require a little hand fitting to your slide. I first started shooting Bar-Sto barrels when I was with the Army Marksmanship Unit using M1911A1's. In my experience all three manufacturers have all shown tighter shot groups than the factory barrels, but no one comes close to Bar-Sto.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surf View Post
    What are you looking for out of your Glock? Plinking, work, competition?
    I'm just trying to get a tighter spread when qualifying. I fully understand that the main way to achieve this is to practice and to get better, but I'd like to get a little help from a barrel if possible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackhorse View Post
    I left a post on your recoil question and then saw this post. Sounds to me like you are considering tricking out your Glock. Of course, once you do that, you will not want to carry this gun for duty or concealment. Except for their extended/competition guns, Glocks are not made with the inherent accuracy expected from a top competition gun. They are designed primarily for the military (not ours) and law enforcement, and they are designed to keep costs down so they have a lot of inter-changeability, and they all do well within those specifications. But they will not meet the requirements of a serious competitor. That's why Glock designed the GSSF. They had to have a competition where Glock owners could win in.

    Yes, I've put a couple different barrels on my Glocks. A word of warning here. BEWARE of anyone who tells you their barrels are MATCH GRADE and are drop in, no gunsmithing required. NOT. A true match grade barrel is custom fit to your gun.

    However, there are some benefits to going with aftermarket barrels. Generally speaking aftermarket barrels are more accurate than Glock factory. Partly due to the type of rifling, crown, polished feed ramp, and the fact that tolerances will be tighter on an aftermarket barrel. Probably the number one reason for going with an aftermarket barrel is the fact that you can shoot lead with most of them, whereas lead and Glock factory barrels do not go well together. In competition, lead bullets are a lot cheaper to make than jacketed bullets are, and if you're a serious competitor, you're going to shoot a lot. Jacketed bullets get expensive real fast when your shooting upwards of 1,000 rounds a week.

    Having said all that, there are some fine barrels on the market, such as Lone Wolf (probably the cheapest and runs about $100), KKM (a good barrel that runs about $175), etc. The best barrel I've ever used is the Bar-Sto barrels (they've been number 1 in after market barrels for over 30 years. A cheap on will run about $200), but they are not drop in barrels, they do require a little hand fitting to your slide. I first started shooting Bar-Sto barrels when I was with the Army Marksmanship Unit using M1911A1's. In my experience all three manufacturers have all shown tighter shot groups than the factory barrels, but no one comes close to Bar-Sto.
    This was an extremely helpful post. Thanks a lot.

    I'll start looking into Bar-Sto barrels and get my gunsmith's opinion on installing one.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by irolllow View Post
    I'm just trying to get a tighter spread when qualifying. I fully understand that the main way to achieve this is to practice and to get better, but I'd like to get a little help from a barrel if possible.
    If all you are looking to do is improve your qualifying score, I would advise against a new barrel but instead take that $100($200 plus gunsmit fees if you go the real match barrel route) or so and get you some ammo. Aftermarket barrels meant for competition purposes will not help your score. Down here in Louisiana, there is at least one IPSC competitor that made Master using a stock Glock barrel.

    Hit the range a bit and you will do fine. Marksmanship is one thing that no matter what aftermarket part is out there for your firearm, if you are not doing your part ie correct grip, stance etc, it won't matter one bit.

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    I got my storm lake barrel today and just got done putting 250 rounds of WWB ball through it. My groups are noticeably better, say .5'' to 1'' at 15 yards. Single hand felt slightly more solid and off hand felt about the same. I go to the range once a week and this has definitely helped A LITTLE. If you go to the range no more than once a month, I doubt it would do much. Of course I'm comparing my results from one day so I'll have to compare over a few more weeks to get a better understanding of the accuracy gains.

    The follow up shots felt quicker with this barrel, but I'm not going to make the assumption that the barrel had anything to do with it.

    +1 on grip mechanics. The more I practice the more I understand how crucial the grip is when determining accuracy.

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