1. #1
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    Service animal vs. therapy animal

    Is there a difference?

    I looked it up and it appears a service animal is for someone who is blind, deaf, etc.

    I'm assuming a therapy animal serves a different purpose. My question is does a store have to allow a therapy animal (dog) on their premises?

    I'm in Arizona by the way.

  2. #2
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    Bringing animals (Dogs) on private property usually is at the discretion of the private property/buisness owner. But I usually only see "therapy" dogs in hospitals and rehabilitation centers helping injured/sick people.

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    I've seen people with therapy dogs because they are lonely. If they don't have papers saying they are a legal service animal or a tag saying they are one I'm going to treat them like any other dog. Besides, I don't want your dogs butt to be where I might put my groceries. This kick-me dog trend is really annoying.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rockk View Post
    Is there a difference?

    I looked it up and it appears a service animal is for someone who is blind, deaf, etc.

    I'm assuming a therapy animal serves a different purpose. My question is does a store have to allow a therapy animal (dog) on their premises?

    I'm in Arizona by the way.
    I went through a class recently concerning service animals because people tend to feel like they can bring their dog in an airport at any time. From what I gathered from the class, service animals are the only animals where folks have to make an exception (per ADA).

    A therapy animal is going to have to stay outside as far as our building is concerned, unless they are flying out in a kennel.
    I'm 10-8 like a shark in a sea of crime..

  5. #5
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    At our airport, we have a "no loose pets" policy inside the terminal. Pets must be in a carrier. As security supervisor at our airport, we occasionally see people with what they claim to be "service dogs" so we are tasked with verifying the service dog documentation. Service dogs only have to be on leash, not in carriers.

    Just this past week, we observed a lady walking through the terminal with a "weenie" dog (since I can't spell "daschund") on a leash. Now maybe I need to get out more, but I have never seen a "weenie" dog as a service dog. One of my newer deputies approached her and asked about the dog. She told him that it was a service dog, but refused to provide any proof.

    I was watching the exchange on the surveillance monitors, and it was obvious that my deputy was not having much success. He came up to the monitor room, and told me what took place.

    I told him to come with me and we would go talk to her again.

    When I approached the woman, and asked for the status of the dog, and if she had documentation to verify that it was a service dog, the first thing out of her mouth was, "I'm going to sue for harrassment."

    Oh yeah, lady, go ahead and trip my trigger.

    I informed her that no one is harrassing her, we were doing what we are required to do and the deputy was doing his job, and that since she failed to cooperate with him, that was interfering in a police investigation, and then threatened me with a lawsuit, I considered that to be intimidation of a public official, she had the choice of providing me with the paperwork I was requesting or spend the night in my jail.

    She then decided that providing the documentation was the smarter course of action.

    The "weenie", BTW, was a certified service dog, in her case for hearing impaired people.

    I thanked her for her "cooperation", and bid her a great day.

    Sure would have been a lot simpler if she had simply cooperated.

    Sometimes you have to slap 'em just to get their attention. Some children's people.


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    Thanks for the responses.

    Pretty much what I thought. We have a lady come in every once in a while to my store and she carries her dog with her. Of course, we don't allow animals (except service animals), so we ask her to not return with the dog and she goes off about how we need to learn the laws, etc.

    The dog had a vest that said "Therapy dog" on it, not service. She came in again with her dog. Both times she never buys anything so I think she's just looking for someone to harass her.

  7. #7
    JLW
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    Any of y'all ever came across a service MONKEY??!!? I did a few months ago working a detail, craziest thing I've seen. A service monkey, would have never guessed it was true, if I had not seen the paperwork and the lil fella in action myself

  8. #8
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    I've seen a service snake, it alerted somehow when the owner was going to have a seizure.

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    Cajun,

    From my understanding, per ADA those with service animals can be asked whether the animal is a service animal, but they do not have to provide proof.

    3. Q: How can I tell if an animal is really a service animal and not just a pet?


    A: Some, but not all, service animals wear special collars and harnesses. Some, but not all, are licensed or certified and have identification papers. If you are not certain that an animal is a service animal, you may ask the person who has the animal if it is a service animal required because of a disability. However, an individual who is going to a restaurant or theater is not likely to be carrying documentation of his or her medical condition or disability. Therefore, such documentation generally may not be required as a condition for providing service to an individual accompanied by a service animal. Although a number of states have programs to certify service animals, you may not insist on proof of state certification before permitting the service animal to accompany the person with a disability.


    This quote is from the US DOJ (Civil Rights Division) webpage listed here:

    http://www.ada.gov/qasrvc.htm

    I'm pretty sure a little more research will also indicate the same.
    I'm 10-8 like a shark in a sea of crime..

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