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Love_Cops
08-20-2007, 08:38 AM
Hi, all officers.
I have a quick question.

When the traffic light turn red, AT THAT MOMENT,
my vehicle's front wheels already passed the solid white line, but the rear.

Am I considered a red light runner?
Thanks for reading.

JKralC104
08-20-2007, 10:04 AM
If any part of you vehicle is in the intersection when the light is red, you have run the light.

Bing_Oh
08-20-2007, 11:54 AM
If any part of you vehicle is in the intersection when the light is red, you have run the light.

I disagree. It's legal to enter the intersection on a yellow light as long as you're "using due caution," and have the light change to red while you're still within the intersection. So, unless you're failing to use due caution as you enter the intersection on yellow, you could be within the intersection on a red light and still be legal.

JKralC104
08-20-2007, 12:50 PM
I can't argue your point on that. But how many people have we seen actually use caution as opposed to gun it to get past the light? I always loved stopping a guy, having him tell me he tried to stop when CLEARLY the nose of his car was lifting during the hard acceleration to attempt to beat the light.

AKA=Cruz
08-20-2007, 12:56 PM
I disagree with Bing Oh.

The yellow does not mean hurry across before it turns red. There is plenty of time to slow to a stop, on yellow to bring a vehicle to a complet stop.


§ 544.010. STOP[0] SIGNS AND YIELD SIGNS. (a) Unless
directed to proceed by a police officer or traffic-control signal[0],
the operator of a vehicle or streetcar approaching an intersection
with a stop[0] sign shall stop[0] as provided by Subsection (c).
(b) If safety requires, the operator of a vehicle
approaching a yield sign shall stop[0] as provided by Subsection (c).
(c) An operator required to stop[0] by this section shall stop[0]
before entering the crosswalk on the near side of the intersection.
In the absence of a crosswalk, the operator shall stop[0] at a clearly
marked stop[0] line. In the absence of a stop[0] line, the operator shall
stop[0] at the place nearest the intersecting roadway where the
operator has a view of approaching traffic on the intersecting
roadway.

PhilipCal
08-20-2007, 12:59 PM
I used the painted "limit line" as the threshold for issuing a red light citation. What most of us attempt, or should attempt to do, is view the entire picture. You approach the intersection at normal as in lawful speed, and enter on yellow, no problem. You gun the vehicle, or increase speed to beat the red light= citation. You approach the intersection on yellow, the light turns red before, or at the limit line=citation. At the end of the day, it's the Officer's call. Proper, attentive driving, eliminates most of these situations.

VA Dutch
08-20-2007, 03:41 PM
We nearly always used the "perpendicular line" as the threshold for whether or not the light was 'ran' or not. If the front of the car was over the line before the light turned red, then the person would not be stopped. If the light were red before the front bumper crossed the line, then a stop could be made.

I can't think of any controlled intersection (in my county) where the was not a painted line, but I am certain they exist. VDOT is typically pretty good about marking intersections, but the lines might not be there if the road was recently resurfaced or patched.

One big problem is the timing of the yellow light. Most traffic signals in 45-mph (or higher) zones will stay yellow for four seconds. This is ample time to safely stop at that velocity, but every now and then you'll find a "three second" yellow that can make things a bit rough. (Ironically, red-light cameras seem to be installed at that type of signal with a 'short' yellow.)

Since there is normally a two-second delay from one direction having a red light to the side street having a green signal, any car that goes past the "stop bar" should have ample time to clear the intersection before cross traffic is moving. {Oh, yeah.....we all know that cars on the side street will sometimes jump the green too.}
:eek:

I predict this will be a long-lived thread.
:o

P.S. If the entire vehicle had to be beyond the white line before the yellow turned to red, a tractor-trailer driver would be in trouble!

SgtScott31
08-20-2007, 07:51 PM
If you are before the stop bar when the light turns red and continue through, then you get a ticket from me.

JDCOP
08-20-2007, 11:45 PM
If you cross the stop line at before it turns red thats not running the light to me. But how many times I have sat and watched people run it and say I had already crossed it. The view is much better from outside we can usually see it better than the driver.

redbird07
08-20-2007, 11:50 PM
If any part of you vehicle is in the intersection when the light is red, you have run the light.

Not true in MD. If your vehicle has passed the prolongation of the intersection lines prior to the light turning red, you are not in violation of the traffic law regarding running red lights. Simply being in the intersection while the light is red does not constitute a traffic violation.

mdrdep
08-21-2007, 01:11 AM
In Ca the violation happens if you cross the limit line after the light turns red. So If your front wheels are already across the limit line and the light turns red no ticket. Now if the light turns red and then you cross the limit line=ticket, Or the light turns red and you do stop but your wheels cross the limit line, technically a violation you can be cited for!

My other favorite is the anti-gridlock law of entering an intersection without sufficient clearance. Get stuck in the middle of an intersection because traffic was backed up on the other side and you lacked patience and wanted to get into the intersection before the light turned red, you get a ticket even though you entered on a green....

JSD73
08-21-2007, 01:21 AM
One does not always have time to stop on a dime, especially if in an area where the speed limit is 55mph. The light happens to turn yellow and you're close so you have to go through the intersection and it happens to turn red as you have passed the point of no return. So you either slam your brakes on, maybe get hit from behind, or you slide out into the intersection...either way, I would hope that all officers use discretion and COMMON SENSE when deciding if what we witnessed is a true violation. I think I can tell when someone intends to get thru a red light blatantly as opposed to someone entering the point of no return and not being able to stop in time.

VA Dutch
08-21-2007, 09:22 AM
One does not always have time to stop on a dime, especially if in an area where the speed limit is 55mph. The light happens to turn yellow and you're close so you have to go through the intersection and it happens to turn red as you have passed the point of no return. So you either slam your brakes on, maybe get hit from behind, or you slide out into the intersection...


Either way, I would hope that all officers use discretion and COMMON SENSE when deciding if what we witnessed is a true violation. I think I can tell when someone intends to get thru a red light blatantly as opposed to someone entering the point of no return and not being able to stop in time.


Alas, "common sense" does not seem to be very common anymore.

Excellent post, JSD. Please proceed to the head of the class.
:D

t150vsuptpr
08-21-2007, 12:39 PM
Hi, all officers.
I have a quick question.

When the traffic light turn red, AT THAT MOMENT,
my vehicle's front wheels already passed the solid white line, but the rear.

Am I considered a red light runner?
Thanks for reading.

§ 46.2-833. Traffic lights; penalty.

A. Signals by traffic lights shall be as follows:

Steady red indicates that moving traffic shall stop and remain stopped as long as the red signal is shown, except in the direction indicated by a lighted green arrow.

Green indicates the traffic shall move in the direction of the signal and remain in motion as long as the green signal is given, except that such traffic shall yield to other vehicles and pedestrians lawfully within the intersection.

Steady amber indicates that a change is about to be made in the direction of the moving of traffic. When the amber signal is shown, traffic which has not already entered the intersection, including the crosswalks, shall stop if it is not reasonably safe to continue, but traffic which has already entered the intersection shall continue to move until the intersection has been cleared. The amber signal is a warning that the steady red signal is imminent.

Flashing red indicates that traffic shall stop before entering an intersection.

Flashing amber indicates that traffic may proceed through the intersection or past such signal with reasonable care under the circumstances.

B. If the traffic lights controlling an intersection are out of service because of a power failure or other event that prevents the giving of signals by the traffic lights, the drivers of vehicles approaching such an intersection shall proceed as though such intersection were controlled by a stop sign on all approaches. The provisions of this subsection shall not apply to: intersections controlled by portable stop signs, intersections with law-enforcement officers or other authorized persons directing traffic, or intersections controlled by traffic lights displaying flashing red or flashing amber lights as provided in subsection A.

C. The driver of any motor vehicle may be detained or arrested for a violation of this section if the detaining law-enforcement officer is in uniform, displays his badge of authority, and (i) has observed the violation or (ii) has received a message by radio or other wireless telecommunication device from another law-enforcement officer who observed the violation. In the case of a person being detained or arrested based on a radio message, the message shall be sent immediately after the violation is observed, and the observing officer shall furnish the license number or other positive identification of the vehicle to the detaining officer.

Violation of any provision of this section shall constitute a traffic infraction punishable by a fine of no more than $350.
You leave out some things.

Red lights are preceeded by Amber lights. Are you stopped or moving, and how fast, and did the Amber provide adequate warning of the coming Red or is it a short light, or did you speed up when the Amber came out to beat the Red?

If you entered the intersection under Green and been stopped waiting to turn left, you would clear the intersection now, and other traffic which now has the Green are to yield to you as specified.

FirstStrike
08-21-2007, 01:05 PM
I have a new question, if stop light fines were greatly increased do you think we'd see fewer accidents and runners?

ISPCAPT
08-21-2007, 01:21 PM
One does not always have time to stop on a dime, especially if in an area where the speed limit is 55mph. The light happens to turn yellow and you're close so you have to go through the intersection and it happens to turn red as you have passed the point of no return. So you either slam your brakes on, maybe get hit from behind, or you slide out into the intersection...either way, I would hope that all officers use discretion and COMMON SENSE when deciding if what we witnessed is a true violation. I think I can tell when someone intends to get thru a red light blatantly as opposed to someone entering the point of no return and not being able to stop in time.

You forgot about 1 person. What about the other person at the intersection who had been waiting for the red light to change to green and when it does he proceeds into the intersection just as your person above decides to use "common sense", goes thru the red light and gets t-boned by the person using "common sense"? The person with the green has the legal right away. The person with "common sense" violated the light.
Doesn't matter what the speed, whether 55 in your example or 20 in a school zone, one has to anticipate that the light may be preparing to change. The speed limit doesn't matter.

SgtScott31
08-21-2007, 02:33 PM
Unless there is a red light at the crest of hill or a curve where one cannot see the light change, I do not see the issue. There may be a few of those lights, but they are definitely few and far between, and discretion should be exercised.

You cannot tell me that a person fails to see a steady yellow for 2-3 seconds and not have enough time to stop before entering the intersection on a steady red, even at 55mph.

Like I said, if you enter the intersection after the light has turned red, then you will get a ticket. If the light turns red while you are in the intersection, I normally do not stop them.

Love_Cops
08-22-2007, 12:34 AM
Thanks for all response.

Love_Cops
08-22-2007, 12:54 AM
You cannot tell me that a person fails to see a steady yellow for 2-3 seconds and not have enough time to stop before entering the intersection on a steady red, even at 55mph.



When I see a yellow light, I always have enough time to stop whatever the speed limit is, because my E-class has excellent brakes :)

I usually concern about which car is following me and how far is between us.
When I am followed by a 80s civic or corolla, I know I must stop for law and safety for the others, but my car. Officers, if you drive M3 or Porsche, do you stop? :D

I hate those drivers tailgate the others!!!!!!! :mad:
I really hope that the fines for following too close is 2K and above!!

p.s. sorry for bad english :p

JSD73
08-22-2007, 02:57 AM
You forgot about 1 person. What about the other person at the intersection who had been waiting for the red light to change to green and when it does he proceeds into the intersection just as your person above decides to use "common sense", goes thru the red light and gets t-boned by the person using "common sense"? The person with the green has the legal right away. The person with "common sense" violated the light.
Doesn't matter what the speed, whether 55 in your example or 20 in a school zone, one has to anticipate that the light may be preparing to change. The speed limit doesn't matter.

As for speaking of common sense, I was talking about police officers using common sense in determining a blatant violation over one that just couldn't be avoided, not the drivers of said opposing vehicles. If someone is caught in the zone of no return, then I highly doubt, as the person is damn near in the intersection, that there will be a t-boning....that would occur if it was a blatant good distance back red light run. We are speaking of the point in which a car is within the first two marked lines or so when the light hits yellow, then turns red as the vehicle enters into the intersection...you telling me that your car can stop on a dime like that at speeds of 45 mph or better? Mine can't. I guess discretion is dead these days.

Personally, I was t boned by someone who ran a red light but to show you how far back they were, I watched as my light turned green, saw a car go thru the intersection a good two seconds after my light was green, laid on my horn at them and then went thru the intersection.......BAM.........struck by another vehicle who ran the red light. That's a red light run...not someone who gets caught in the last second turning......Now, I, as should most, actually look around the intersection before proceeding after green. I know most people don't do it.......

I'm not a big ticket writer, I don't get off on it, and I think far too many police officers want to play Mr. I don't do anything wrong cause I enforce the laws so you better not break em in front of me......like I said, I believe most officers have enough common sense to see when it is a blatant violation over one that simply happened because of poor timing.

Blackdog F4i
08-22-2007, 09:16 AM
State law says if the vehicle enters the intersection after the light has turned red, you ran it.

"I" take it one further, and if you enter the intersection when cross traffic gets the green, i am going to smoke you.

Generally drivers like that have conditioned themselves to gas-on when they see the yellow. This opens them up to catching the red and ALSO to collecting the "creepers" who like to anticipate the green.

Yellow lights are there for a reason, and if the City Garage/State DOT/etc. engineers have done thier job, then the delay is set based on the speed of traffic (and not generally just the posted speed).

I have witnessed a BAD trend of Semi-Drivers who will gas on to beat the yellow. The next one I catch that tells me his vehicle was too heavy/large/pavement too slick to stop in time is going to get smoked for reckless driving.

VA Dutch
08-22-2007, 01:28 PM
Yellow lights are there for a reason, and if the City Garage/State DOT/etc. engineers have done thier job, then the delay is set based on the speed of traffic (and not generally just the posted speed).



In some areas, that is quite a tall order! I have seen lights that stay yellow for a long, long time on 35-mph roads. However, some others (such as VA 28 in Fairfax & Prince William Counties) in 55-mph zones are so short that you would have to have the reflexes of a fighter pilot and the brakes of a new Corvette in order to stop safely & in time.
:rolleyes:



I have witnessed a BAD trend of Semi-Drivers who will gas on to beat the yellow. The next one I catch that tells me his vehicle was too heavy/large/pavement too slick to stop in time is going to get smoked for reckless driving.


Unfortunately, this is probably not just a trend. There are many times when people in commercial vehicles end up in the "should I stop or should I go" trap. It is not possible to stop a large truck or bus in the same amount of time it takes in a four-wheeler. In some cases - but certainly not all of the time - timing of lights in comparison to average vehicular velocity {as you mentioned above} needs to be re-examined from time to time.

Be safe out there and Semper Fi to you.

Fuzz
08-22-2007, 07:05 PM
I disagree with Bing Oh.

The yellow does not mean hurry across before it turns red. There is plenty of time to slow to a stop, on yellow to bring a vehicle to a complet stop.


§ 544.010. STOP[0] SIGNS AND YIELD SIGNS. (a) Unless
directed to proceed by a police officer or traffic-control signal[0],
the operator of a vehicle or streetcar approaching an intersection
with a stop[0] sign shall stop[0] as provided by Subsection (c).
(b) If safety requires, the operator of a vehicle
approaching a yield sign shall stop[0] as provided by Subsection (c).
(c) An operator required to stop[0] by this section shall stop[0]
before entering the crosswalk on the near side of the intersection.
In the absence of a crosswalk, the operator shall stop[0] at a clearly
marked stop[0] line. In the absence of a stop[0] line, the operator shall
stop[0] at the place nearest the intersecting roadway where the
operator has a view of approaching traffic on the intersecting
roadway.


Did I miss something...... the question was regarding red/yellow/green traffic signals and you quoted a stop sign/ yield sign statute?

In Ca if any part of your vehicle is across the limit line before the light turns red you have entered the intersection and there is no violation.

t150vsuptpr
08-23-2007, 02:00 PM
What about the other person at the intersection who had been waiting for the red light to change to green and when it does he proceeds into the intersection just as your person above decides to use "common sense", goes thru the red light and gets t-boned by the person using "common sense"? The person with the green has the legal right away. The person with "common sense" violated the light
To the driver of such a car waiting at a red light for the green, I would simply say ...

Always look before you leap. Just blindly going ahead at the first hint of green is a recipe for fatal disaster. Might be a 40 ton truck and a short yellow on the cross road, might be a LEO running hot and silent with only blues on and failing to stop for the light .... in any case, his fault or yours, it don't matter ... you still gonna hurt when the front bumper starts caving in that door and crushing the seat and your hip as it drives that cell phone deeper into your left ear. ... besides, how you gonna know if anyone else is lawfully within the intersection when it turns if you don't look?
Green indicates the traffic shall move in the direction of the signal and remain in motion as long as the green signal is given, except that such traffic shall yield to other vehicles and pedestrians lawfully within the intersection.


As to others, I too have seen yellow lights timed too short for adequate reaction and stopping times on some 55 MPH highways and roadways. Some were in Ga. on the way to where my BIL used to live. Va. Dutch points out some cases of short yellows as well, here in Va.

There are also some places where an advance warning yellow starts flashing some distance ahead at the approach of an impending yellow/red traffic light, and I have seen DAs "stand on it" then to hurry up as I gently started braking.

There are also known instances of communities having taken contracts with red light cams and shortening up the yellows to generate fines in some states, very bad trend and any community which allows it's council or city manager to do this deserves every CS ticket they get in return ... but I hate it for the tourist and other out of towners traveling through. I pray this isn't a trend but an aborition.

ISPCAPT
08-23-2007, 02:20 PM
To the driver of such a car waiting at a red light for the green, I would simply say ...
... besides, how you gonna know if anyone else is lawfully within the intersection when it turns if you don't look? .
You're talking defensive driving habits. That's not the topic. The question is if the red light runner is legal. The guy with the green has the right of way.
If the driver is running too fast, even within the speed limit, but is unable to control his vehicle then he's too fast for conditions. Handled numerous crashes where the driver said he couldn't stop for the changing light because the pavement was wet or slick. Too bad. Too fast for conditions. If the conditions are there's a light approaching then the conditions are the driver has to be ready for conditions to change, ie, changing light.

Fuzz
08-23-2007, 03:47 PM
You're talking defensive driving habits. That's not the topic. The question is if the red light runner is legal. The guy with the green has the right of way.
If the driver is running too fast, even within the speed limit, but is unable to control his vehicle then he's too fast for conditions. Handled numerous crashes where the driver said he couldn't stop for the changing light because the pavement was wet or slick. Too bad. Too fast for conditions. If the conditions are there's a light approaching then the conditions are the driver has to be ready for conditions to change, ie, changing light.

California Vehicle code
21451. (a) A driver facing a circular green signal shall proceed
straight through or turn right or left or make a U-turn unless a sign
prohibits a U-turn. Any driver, including one turning, shall yield
the right-of-way to other traffic and to pedestrians lawfully within
the intersection or an adjacent crosswalk.

A fresh green light is not a free pass to romp on the gas and drive through the intersection. When the light turns green you are now allowed to move as long as you yield to all other vehicles that have legally entered the intersection before you. For example, a vehicle that has entered the intersection and is waiting in the middle to make a left turn. If cross traffic light turns green the vehicle waiting to make the turn still has the right of way and the vehicle with the green light must wait and yield until it moves (even though they have a green light). Most signals have a delay between a red on one side and a green on the other to clear the intersection. If someone has legally crossed the limit line they are not a "red light runner" and the other traffic that now has a green light must yield until the intersection is clear. If the car is behind the limit line when it turns to a red light then they are at fault.

ISPCAPT
08-23-2007, 04:00 PM
A fresh green light is not a free pass to romp on the gas and drive through the intersection. When the light turns green you are now allowed to move as long as you yield to all other vehicles that have legally entered the intersection before you.

I fully realize that. However, you made my point for me when you said the other vehicles have "legally entered the intersection". Those entering the intersection after the light as turned red are not in that intersection legally.
This question is on our basic IL Vehicle Code test. No trick question.

Iszi
08-23-2007, 04:44 PM
Pardon me if I've missed where this has been addressed already:


For example, a vehicle that has entered the intersection and is waiting in the middle to make a left turn...

I'm sure it varies by jurisdiction, but aren't there laws against this as well? This is not to suggest that an accident would necessarily be the fault of the person waiting in the intersection. I think most people would agree that fault logically lies more with a person whose vehicle is moving, than with one whose vehicle is not - except maybe in particularly "special" cases. But still, aren't there laws against blocking an intersection in such manner as this, regardless of whether you "entered" the intersection legally?

Perhaps Fuzz is referring to people who make half of their turn on green, while they're waiting for a clear spot in opposing traffic. My question is more targeted towards those who start their procession through the intersection when it is clear that they won't (or particularly unclear whether they will) be able to make it out of the intersection before the change of the light, due to traffic congestion in front of them.

Either maneuver in my opinion is just senseless, and at the very least rude to the drivers in cross traffic. I personally wait until I know I'll be able to get my car completely through the intersection before the cross traffic gets their green. But the question I'm still posing is: Are there laws that require this of us, or not?

Fuzz
08-23-2007, 06:43 PM
It is common place for a vehicle to enter the intersection to make a left turn and have to wait for an opening to safely do so. They enter the intersection legally on a green light from either a left turn lane or a regular lane and wait to turn. This is completely legal and the only way that you can make a left turn in many intersections. When there is an opening they complete the left turn and are out of the intersection.

This is NOT the same as gridlock. If multiple cars try to make the left turn when there is no room on the other side of the intersection and are stuck in the intersection blocking traffic then that is illegal, rude and good for a ticket.

GatorPD
08-29-2007, 09:16 AM
If any part of you vehicle is in the intersection when the light is red, you have run the light.


Florida Law is pretty clear on it. ENTERRING an intersection after the light ahs turned red is illegal. Therefor, if any part of your vehicle is already in the intersection already, you have not enterred it. Now does this mean that sometimes we don't stop people who carelessly or recklessly speed up to attempt to beat the light, even if they beat it by 1/4 of a second? You can always do a Careless Driving stop or a Speeding stop as opposed to a red light violation.

Turn lane squatting is legal in Florida because of this, as they are already in the intersection, so long as they get out of it before the perpendicular traffic lanes begin to move (if they wait too long, then they are obstructing traffic). There is a specific statute, however, that addresses "taking control" of an intersection. Like someone said above, you cannot have a line of people sitting out there that would obstruct other traffic. In fact, I THINK (dont have statute in front of me) it specifies that only one car from each lane can control the intersection at a time (so if a bunch of people want to turn left, everyone except the front person has to wait at the line until its clear to go all the way through)

Taylor1430
09-01-2007, 10:51 AM
One does not always have time to stop on a dime, especially if in an area where the speed limit is 55mph. The light happens to turn yellow and you're close so you have to go through the intersection and it happens to turn red as you have passed the point of no return. So you either slam your brakes on, maybe get hit from behind, or you slide out into the intersection...either way, I would hope that all officers use discretion and COMMON SENSE when deciding if what we witnessed is a true violation. I think I can tell when someone intends to get thru a red light blatantly as opposed to someone entering the point of no return and not being able to stop in time.

In your scenario, I usually find that speed is a factor. If you are doing the posted speed limit and paying attention, there really should not be a point of no return. If you are far enough from the intersection to stop when it turns yellow, then stop....if you are too close then proceed and you should have crossed the line prior to the light turning red.

The point of no return comes up when people are speeding or not paying attention and realize at the last second that the light is changing.

Mr.Den
10-11-2007, 08:31 PM
In the area I live, (Elyria OH) there are crosswalk signals at every intersection. (even on SR 113 which has a speed limit of 55 MPH)

I use them to predict when a signal I am approaching is going to change.

They will start blinking the "do not walk" signal, blink 12 times, then go solid "do not walk" for 4 seconds.

After this 4 second time, the traffic signal will turn yellow.

I do not know if this is typical, but in the northern Ohio area where I drive, it is pretty standard.

If you pay attention to these things when you drive, the situation should never happen where you would enter an intersection on a red light.

Dudley DoRight
10-21-2007, 12:41 PM
Red light

129 (1) Subject to subsection (2), when a red light alone is exhibited at an intersection by a traffic control signal, the driver of a vehicle approaching the intersection and facing the red light must cause it to stop before entering the marked crosswalk on the near side of the intersection, or if there is no marked crosswalk, before entering the intersection, and subject to the provisions of subsection (3), must not cause the vehicle to proceed until a traffic control signal instructs the driver that he or she is permitted to do so.

Noah
10-22-2007, 04:09 AM
I go by the stop bar (thick white line). If any of your car is past that and it turns red, you're safe. However, we have a "disregard yellow light" infraction as well. That's used if someone noticeably speeds up to make it through on a yellow. It's the same fine/points as disregarding a red.

FrozenNorthAK
11-14-2007, 03:43 PM
Well its winter time here now and white crap falling from the sky has littered it self everywhere (snowing). People seem to think because its icy out that it’s ok to "slide" through the intersections here. When I hear "but...but... officer, I slid through the intersection, I tried to stop! " well that’s an automatic cite for the red light or stop sign and a second one for failure to maintain control of the vehicle. Most people pay them, but a few have dragged me in to court. They lost.

Tikidaddy
12-03-2007, 12:25 PM
My favorite is "Officer I didn't see the light change because of the truck in front of me"....I always give them a choice. "So do you want a ticket for failure to stop for the light? or Following too close?"

Also, I've found it to be most people throw caution out the window and speed up to make it through not slow down, they get cited.

miked6
12-03-2007, 12:34 PM
Hi, all officers.
I have a quick question.

When the traffic light turn red, AT THAT MOMENT,
my vehicle's front wheels already passed the solid white line, but the rear.

Am I considered a red light runner?
Thanks for reading.

If your that close you could have and should have stopped if you were traveling the speed limit. There is a formula for most yellow lights. I think it is something like. the light stays yellow for 1 second for every 10 mph of a posted speed limit. I can't recall exactly how it works. Basically, there is plenty of time to stop and/or clear the intersection if you are traveling the speed limit. If you are cutting it that close, then you had more than enough time to stop.

Cubfan
12-04-2007, 07:55 AM
I have witnessed a BAD trend of Semi-Drivers who will gas on to beat the yellow. The next one I catch that tells me his vehicle was too heavy/large/pavement too slick to stop in time is going to get smoked for reckless driving.


Unfortunately, this is probably not just a trend. There are many times when people in commercial vehicles end up in the "should I stop or should I go" trap. It is not possible to stop a large truck or bus in the same amount of time it takes in a four-wheeler. In some cases - but certainly not all of the time - timing of lights in comparison to average vehicular velocity {as you mentioned above} needs to be re-examined from time to time.

I am not a road cop (I'm a jail deputy), but I had a brief career in truck driving, so I wanted to comment on this then I will scram;

Truck drivers should and in most cases are trained to take the size/weight of their load into consideration when they are driving down the road. If they are too heavy or the weather conditions are crap, then they are supposed to drive at a slower speed that allows them to operate their vehicle in a safe manner. So next time a truck driver says he was too heavy or it was too slick to stop safely, write him up and tell him to show you his logbook while your at it. That is a trucker equivelent to being told you're being audited. ;)