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Jyn
06-12-2007, 12:29 AM
Is what I read here quite some time ago.

There seemed to be a discussion on retirement and the statement "Most cops don't live five years past retirement" came upon the topic.

Overly stressful job, or retire when you're 80; five years away from the average life-span of a male :D

Discuss.

Kpdpipes
06-12-2007, 07:57 AM
That has slowly started to change, as hiring ages reduce. When i came on, the average guy who was an old-timer had gotten hired around age 30, meaning they werent elligible until their mid-late 50's. Now, the average hiring age is 23-24. Other factors are healthier lifestyles, more activities, more departments with physical standards, better health care in general..that all adds up. When I was a newbie we worked around the clock, changing shifts every tour, with double nights trhown in. Almost everyone smoked, ate REALLY bad food as a matter of course, and was no stranger to adult libations off-duty. While the boozing hasnt changed much, the rest has.

PhilipCal
06-12-2007, 12:57 PM
Is what I read here quite some time ago.

There seemed to be a discussion on retirement and the statement "Most cops don't live five years past retirement" came upon the topic.

You guys either have a overly stressful job, or retire when you're 80; five years away from the average life-span of a male :D

Discuss.

Hope you're wrong about the "five year" part. I've only been retired for 18 months.

hemicop
06-12-2007, 02:05 PM
I'll be happy with 5 years---most Phx cops die 2-3 years after retirement :eek: . As to why--- many officers simply let themselves go or think there's no life after LE and make terrible life choices afterwards. Sure it's changing but at a very, very slow pace. I try to keep busy & in shape in hopes of beating the odds & I'll admit I'm actually in better shape than when I was on the job but there's something about this job that makes people willingly risk their health to do it. Hopefully Depts. in the future will realize all this and adjust accordingly.

PFL
06-12-2007, 03:18 PM
Hope you're wrong about the "five year" part. I've only been retired for 18 months.


Live it up. You'll be dead soon.

IMachU
06-12-2007, 03:28 PM
We had a sergeant retire just last year. He and his lovely wife moved to Mississippi, bought a beautiful house, and he got a job (I heard) with a sheriff's office in a non-patrol type function. He died 2 months later of a heart attack.

We had another a few years ago that died of a heart attack as he left the retirement office - just signed his papers.

I put a lot of blood, sweat and tears into this job....dang it, I wanna get something outta my retirement, too!!

Jyn
06-12-2007, 03:55 PM
Is it believed to be related to stress from the job or simply unhealthy habits? Even with unhealthy habits, I don't believe pastry chefs die shortly after retirement.



Live it up. You'll be dead soon.

LOL

Deputy31
06-12-2007, 04:33 PM
I'm dead inside already........I'm dead inside:cool:


Seriously though, just try and enjoy out of work activities and take care of yourself. If you make you're whole life LE it will kill you.

LuvedMyMotor
06-12-2007, 06:17 PM
duplicate post

LuvedMyMotor
06-12-2007, 06:18 PM
I retired at the ripe old age of 50 after 27 years. I've never been more financially secure in my life, and as much as I absolutely loved my job, I don't miss it at all. I'm almost 3 years into THIS life and looking forward to many, many more. I mean there is NO stress. I've heard stories about guys dying soon after retirement, but I guess my agency is lucky. Not only have we never lost an officer on duty, I don't think ANY officer I've ever known has died yet after he/she retired. That's 27 years of officers retiring and still kicking. Of course, I'm not close to the guys who retired soon after I hired on, but we have a great network of folks who keep everyone informed of "the family" via e-mail. I've gotten a few notifications of former officers passing on, but they've always been guys who left before I came aboard.

PFL
06-12-2007, 06:21 PM
You just HAD to rub it in by posting twice, didn't you Luvmymotor?

LuvedMyMotor
06-12-2007, 06:25 PM
You just HAD to rub it in by posting twice, didn't you Luvmymotor?

Stop it! I don't need the stress! :D

Northtechsan
06-12-2007, 06:41 PM
I think y'all are missing it... its not being away from the job that kills retired officers. Its not having the job as a means to get away from the wife that ultimately is the demise of retired officers.

Jyn
06-12-2007, 06:50 PM
Yeah, you guys are reeaallyy stressed out, huh?:D


I retired at the ripe old age of 50 after 27 years. I've never been more financially secure in my life, and as much as I absolutely loved my job, I don't miss it at all. I'm almost 3 years into THIS life and looking forward to many, many more. I mean there is NO stress. I've heard stories about guys dying soon after retirement, but I guess my agency is lucky. Not only have we never lost an officer on duty, I don't think ANY officer I've ever known has died yet after he/she retired. That's 27 years of officers retiring and still kicking. Of course, I'm not close to the guys who retired soon after I hired on, but we have a great network of folks who keep everyone informed of "the family" via e-mail. I've gotten a few notifications of former officers passing on, but they've always been guys who left before I came aboard.

Let me know how you're doing in two years, please!

deputy x 2
06-12-2007, 07:00 PM
In our dept 53 seems to be the age to get past! :eek: :eek:

I don't plan to be a part of that 5 year statistic...thank you very much!

Jyn
06-12-2007, 07:06 PM
In our dept 53 seems to be the age to get past! :eek: :eek:



Any opinions as to why?

deputy x 2
06-12-2007, 07:12 PM
Any opinions as to why?

There are many factors..............way to many to discuss here.

Lawrence Blum has a book titled "Force under Pressure"..how cops live and why they die. You can get it on amazon.

LuvedMyMotor
06-12-2007, 07:19 PM
There are many factors..............way to many to discuss here.

Lawrence Blum has a book titled "Force under Pressure"..how cops live and why they die. You can get it on amazon.

Do you know if that's the same Dr. Blum who used to be a shrink in Orange County?

LuvedMyMotor
06-12-2007, 07:28 PM
Yeah, you guys are reeaallyy stressed out, huh?:D



Let me know how you're doing in two years, please!

Actually, the job CAN be pretty stressful at times (duh!) ..not just the stuff that happens, but dealing with the public and administration can be very wearing. I think it takes a certain type personality to get through without it totalling getting to you. I worked in a beach community S/W of L.A....wasn't like I was dodging bullets every minute, and of course, I had the motor. Life was good. But now, it's even better.

deputy x 2
06-12-2007, 09:26 PM
Do you know if that's the same Dr. Blum who used to be a shrink in Orange County?

I believe he still puts on seminars. Lawrence N Blum, PhD is a clinical psychologist who has worked with police deptartments for over twenty years. He lives in Los Angeles. (from the back cover of his book)

LuvedMyMotor
06-12-2007, 09:29 PM
Thanks,,,and thanks for the PM replies.

Jyn
06-13-2007, 04:02 PM
From what I have seen, members who live short periods after retirement are those who stay into their late 50's, then retire. I think too when their friends stop calling and such, they go into a mode of depression, because for some policing was their entire life.

Quoted from a google search. Probably someone here who said that.

Is that really what it's all about? That you enjoy your jobs to such an extent that after retirement you simply become depressed that you are no longer doing what you love?

Bing_Oh
06-13-2007, 04:45 PM
I've always believed that the "5 year" statistic was primarily because of drastic changes in the retired officer's life.

First and foremost, for many officers, law enforcement is much more than just a job. The job becomes part of the identity of the officer...to the point that people many times see us not as individuals but as police officers.

The other major factor, I believe, is the stress level. Personally, however, I don't think it's the wear and tear of 20-some years of high-stress shift work taking its cumulative toll...I think it's the loss of stress. Over our careers, officers come to adapt to stress. In many ways, we thrive on stress. Police officers are a group of people who actually get enjoyment out of chasing a guy with a gun through backyards or driving 110 mph to a shots fired call. And, over the course of our careers, our bodies become adapted to that heightened stress level. Then, when we retire, that ultra-heightened stress level is gone, and many officers can't find anything to replace it (the officers who die within 5 years of retirement, statistically, tend to be the ones who don't have hobbies or interests outside of LE).

I think the drastic change, combined with a "loss of identity," kills them.

Jyn
06-13-2007, 04:58 PM
Very interesting input. This is a somewhat difficult topic for me, someone who wants to become an officer, to understand.

I'm already a fitness buff and have many hobbies. So, I guess I wouldn't necessarily know if I would ever become one of those statistics.


I've always believed that the "5 year" statistic was primarily because of drastic changes in the retired officer's life.

First and foremost, for many officers, law enforcement is much more than just a job. The job becomes part of the identity of the officer...to the point that people many times see us not as individuals but as police officers.

The other major factor, I believe, is the stress level. Personally, however, I don't think it's the wear and tear of 20-some years of high-stress shift work taking its cumulative toll...I think it's the loss of stress. Over our careers, officers come to adapt to stress. In many ways, we thrive on stress. Police officers are a group of people who actually get enjoyment out of chasing a guy with a gun through backyards or driving 110 mph to a shots fired call. And, over the course of our careers, our bodies become adapted to that heightened stress level. Then, when we retire, that ultra-heightened stress level is gone, and many officers can't find anything to replace it (the officers who die within 5 years of retirement, statistically, tend to be the ones who don't have hobbies or interests outside of LE).

I think the drastic change, combined with a "loss of identity," kills them.

L-1
06-13-2007, 06:11 PM
There seemed to be a discussion on retirement and the statement "Most cops don't live five years past retirement" came upon the topic.

You guys either have a overly stressful job, or retire when you're 80; five years away from the average life-span of a male :D

Discuss.

PhilipCal has been retired for 18 months, while I have been retired for two years. If the five year rule holds true, this means PhilipCal has 3 1/2 years left to live, while I only have 3. No doubt PhilipCal and I both have many things we wanted to do in our retirement years, which have now been tragically cut short by the five year rule. (I personally wanted to tour Europe for six months.)

I am sure that all of our friends here at o.com would want to help us live as full a life as possible in what little time we have left. Accordingly, I would like to announce the creation of the PhilipCal/L-1 Make a Wish Fund. It's purpose is to help two veteran peace officers live out their greatest dreams in the twilight of their lives. Donations may be sent directly to PhilipCal and myself. Contributors will receive souvenir swizzle sticks from various bars throughout the world that we visit during our final journey.

exComptonCop
06-13-2007, 06:27 PM
I am sure that all of our friends here at o.com would want to help us live as full a life as possible in what little time we have left. Accordingly, I would like to announce the creation of the PhilipCal/L-1 Make a Wish Fund. It's purpose is two help to veteran peace officers live out their greatest dreams in the twilight of their lives. Donations may be sent directly to PhilipCal and myself. Contributors will receive souvenir swizzle sticks from various bars throughout the world that we visit during our final journey.

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d56/a49retired/funnypost.gif

L-1, check your pay pal account ;)

1042 Trooper
06-14-2007, 10:11 PM
:D Me too. My dad soaked 'm for 30 years before he died and I plan to beat his record. my four year anniversary is next month!

On the other hand, you guys can have whatever of my stuff my wife and sons don't want, if I croak tomorrow. :D

Except my air tools. I saved too long to give those up. They go in the oven with me. :D

L-1
06-14-2007, 11:28 PM
my four year anniversary is next month!

Dude,

Only one year left to live! I'll give you half the donations that go into my Make a Wish account.

1042 Trooper
06-15-2007, 12:06 PM
Yeah - that's me - a short timer. AGAIN!

Like I said, 26 years to go if I can help it. :)

L-1
06-15-2007, 02:10 PM
Yeah - that's me - a short timer. AGAIN!

Like I said, 26 years to go if I can help it. :)

A couple of years ago I went to the funeral of one of our retired Deputy Chief's. He was close to 100 years old. He spent 35 years with the department and collected his pension for another 40 years afterward. He was the only person I knew who collected a full pension for longer than he actually worked. Let's make it our goal to beat his record.

1042 Trooper
06-15-2007, 06:38 PM
Roger that. :)

deputy x 2
06-21-2007, 10:44 PM
Chalk one up for the bad side. :mad: :mad: :mad:

He was 52...Rest in peace Alan.