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civilian101
01-25-2005, 10:10 PM
How hard is the transition from officer to sergeant? Does it make a difference if you came from traffic onto patrol? How about day shift to night? Just curious, I have a friend who was just promoted....
Thanks

irishlad2nv
01-25-2005, 10:25 PM
Originally posted by civilian101
How hard is the transition from officer to sergeant? Does it make a difference if you came from traffic onto patrol? How about day shift to night? Just curious, I have a friend who was just promoted....
Thanks

Depends on the department, whether its a Police or Sheriff's Dept...

Does come with more responsibilities though. But again its all on what dept. it is.

Some depts. you sit at a desk and answer calls to the station, take walk-in complaints. Review a patrolmans paperwork before going to someone higher. As far as shifts, you may be switched to a new patrol shift, etc...When I made Corporal, I got moved so that the people I worked with under me now didn't have any mal-treatment, etc...which also came with more responsibilities. But for us, a Sgt. worked the same shifts we did, answered calls or was the road supervisor for the shift, while our LT. would sit and go over paperwork or respond to calls to assist us. Hope that helps, but I am sure LEO's from other depts. will have different views on what their dept. does.

SIGman1
01-25-2005, 11:06 PM
In my department, the sergeants on patrol do not answer radio calls, rather they simply show up to your calls when you least expect it!!:D
If there is an officer in need of assistance/back-up, a sergeant might be the first to respond, if he is the closest. The sergeants on the highway patrol of my department make traffic stops and engage in alot of other officer-initiated activity, but like I said, they are not required to answer radio calls. They also have command positions of specialized units in the department.
I don't mind working with a sergeant on a call, although some guys in my department do. They don't want their actions so closely scrutinized. The way I look at it, a sergeant is the closest administration will get to the officers/deputies.

civilian101
01-25-2005, 11:37 PM
Yah, my friend works in the hood. Says they don't have to respond to calls. provide back up etc. Haven't had a chance to really chat with them to get the full scoop. He used to work days and now does grave yard. How much contact do you think Srgt. have with the actual perps? Let me guess, it depends on the dept?;)

SIGman1
01-26-2005, 12:29 AM
Originally posted by civilian101
How much contact do you think Srgt. have with the actual perps? Let me guess, it depends on the dept?;)

You can't fit all departments into a "one size fits all" mode. Even though there are similarities, no one department is exactly the same as another.

In my department, it would depend entirely on how much back-up to other officers that he provides or how much officer-initiated activity he does.

Delta784
01-26-2005, 01:00 AM
Sergeants on my PD don't answer calls, unless the **** really hits the fan, and even then they usually volunteer rather then get assigned a call.

Unless I get injured, get a call involving a death, have a cruiser accident, or get a call involving another cop, I usually don't see my sergeant during the shift, which is how I like it. :)

retired
01-26-2005, 02:53 AM
The hardest part is the willingness to defecate on those you worked with prior to the promotion.:p Once you get past that, the rest is easy.:D

Curt581
01-26-2005, 06:39 AM
Where I work, the transition is much easier going from Sergeant to a command staff job, than it is from Officer to Sergeant.

The actual promotion process is fairly straight-forward. They use a local, instead of putting you under. They go in through the ear canal, and use a suction hose to pull out the frontal lobe. A simple outpatient proceedure. Our newest Lieutenant said it took about 15 minutes. The only visible side effect was a slight (okay, maybe more than 'slight') drooling problem, but it only took him about two months to get that under control.

:)

Plaso
01-29-2005, 12:44 AM
Then there are the ones who promote and the new position goes directly to their head.:D

Creeker
01-30-2005, 04:32 AM
Originally posted by retired
The hardest part is the willingness to defecate on those you worked with prior to the promotion.:p Once you get past that, the rest is easy.:D

Yeah, that's pretty much the skinny.

The Transition is pretty much a surgical procedure which necessitates the removal of the spinal column... better known as an Odo-fication to some Star Trek fans.

An immediate need to exaggerate the shortcomings of those to whom he is detailed to supervise will quickly manifest itself, despite the newly promoted being reminded via anonymous e-mailings and notes that he was formerly the Agency King of the prohibited activies. These actions are designed to ingratiate ones self with the higher ranking officers, despite the devastating affect it has on the morale of the lower ranks.

The candidate now ignore's his previous belief that a Sgt. should back up his men to both external enemies as well as internal nemses, and readily offers them up for fodder when his butt is on the line, by simply denying that he was told, or that it ever happened. He will be believed by his Superiors, because his word is now better than his underling by the simple fact that he has achieved RANK.

No longer is he bound by the ethics and morals that once held him back. He has achieved the Golden Pass.


I am retired now. I can say the stuff I've seen for a few years.

SinePari
01-30-2005, 08:00 AM
A newly promoted Sgt is like a new officer on the job...they usually get stuck on the shift and the area that nobody wants to work, except now they're the supervisor.

retired
01-30-2005, 01:42 PM
Originally posted by Creeker
Yeah, that's pretty much the skinny.

The Transition is pretty much a surgical procedure which necessitates the removal of the spinal column... better known as an Odo-fication to some Star Trek fans.

An immediate need to exaggerate the shortcomings of those to whom he is detailed to supervise will quickly manifest itself, despite the newly promoted being reminded via anonymous e-mailings and notes that he was formerly the Agency King of the prohibited activies. These actions are designed to ingratiate ones self with the higher ranking officers, despite the devastating affect it has on the morale of the lower ranks.

The candidate now ignore's his previous belief that a Sgt. should back up his men to both external enemies as well as internal nemses, and readily offers them up for fodder when his butt is on the line, by simply denying that he was told, or that it ever happened. He will be believed by his Superiors, because his word is now better than his underling by the simple fact that he has achieved RANK.

No longer is he bound by the ethics and morals that once held him back. He has achieved the Golden Pass.


I am retired now. I can say the stuff I've seen for a few years.


:D :D :D