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Jim1648
02-07-2011, 06:02 PM
I am interested in working for the United States Federal Reserve Police. I just retired from a sworn job at age 50, but I would like to work on another pension. Does anybody happen to know if the Fed hires retired cops or do they prefer younger people? I live within driving distance of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.

Kimble
02-07-2011, 07:38 PM
I am interested in working for the United States Federal Reserve Police. I just retired from a sworn job at age 50, but I would like to work on another pension. Does anybody happen to know if the Fed hires retired cops or do they prefer younger people? I live within driving distance of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.

The fed (speaking specifically to the US Govt, as "the fed" is often a reference to the Federal Reserve as well) has age requirements for jobs covered under 6c/12d LE retirement, but Federal Reserve Police is not one of those jobs. They have a regular non-LE Federal Employees Retirement System pension (which I believe requires at least 25 years to retire). Since Fed Reserve Police officers do primarily physical security work your current age may not be a problem for hiring. Only way to find out for sure is contact the FRB and inquire about their police hiring.

DDixon1000
02-08-2011, 09:12 AM
I'm sure your aware but the Fed Reserve is not part of the Federal Government (Lewis vs. U.S., 680 F. 2d 1239, 1241) They are a private corporation that get their police powers from statute like Amtrak Police, Railroad Police, and so on. The retirement plan is the Federal Reserve System Retirement Plan and they also have the Federal Reserve System Thrift Plan. My understanding is neither plan is a federal retirement plan but is actually a private corporation plan. There has been debate for years over the fed being part of the government or not but that was put to rest in Lewis Vs. U.S. when it was found to be a private corporation. This gets all the more confusing because congress actually created the fed, crazy huh? Anyway, The retirement is vested after 5 years with and you can retire as early as age 55. Each branch operates their police in a different manner. Make sure to find out how your branch treats their police, do they get off duty carry (perps shoot at anything in uniform).

xbull
02-08-2011, 03:39 PM
@Jim1648
I used to used to be an FRLEO before getting picked up by the Marshal's. The FED is not a federal LE position and it is not a traditional LE job either.If you are hired you are pretty much a bank employee. Your duties are primarily the protection of bank property and its assets. As the previous poster stated how you are treated generally depends on what branch you work for. The Fed is not a covered postion nor will your time as a FED LE or military count towards pay or retirement and you will still have to got to the academy. Which is not at FLETC, but the curriculum is FLETC accredited and the Instructors for the most part are certified by FLETC. I went to the academy in Atlanta.

As far as retirement goes the bank has a pretty good retirement plan TSP which I think they will match 80% your first five yrs and dollar for dollar after that. The FED also has PCO (portable cash option) in which you are fully vested in after five years. This is what the bank automatically pays into your retirement. When I left it was aroound 13g's. Far as retirement goes the bank has something called "RULE of 80" which means your age plus the number of years you worked must total 80 in order to get full retirement benefits. So the older you are when hired the better off you will be.

The Fed is a good retirement gig, but if you are looking for high speed kicking in doors and chasing the bad guy, ithis ain't the job, you will get pretty good training, but don't expect to be able to carry your firearm or wear your uniform home or off duty. Unless you are hired in the New York Fed, i think they are cross designated with NYPD.

Kimble
02-08-2011, 04:06 PM
They have a regular non-LE Federal Employees Retirement System pension (which I believe requires at least 25 years to retire).

I stand corrected on the above portion, didn't realize the Federal Reserve was a non-USG agency like Amtrak. Interesting.

Bearcat357
02-08-2011, 04:43 PM
but don't expect to be able to carry your firearm or wear your uniform home or off duty.

Fed Reserve Cops got included on the last HR to update HR218...... They are now allowed to carry off-duty ber US Federal Statute......

http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?c111:5:./temp/~c111z3eyUM::

xbull
02-08-2011, 08:57 PM
Fed Reserve Cops got included on the last HR to update HR218...... They are now allowed to carry off-duty ber US Federal Statute......

http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?c111:5:./temp/~c111z3eyUM::

Depends on the District you're working in. If it is bank policy not to carry off duty you're not. At most of the districts you turn in your weapon at the end of the shift, and you are considered off duty. The Federal Reserve is a completly different animal all together. As i said earlier you are not a Gov't employee you are a private employee of the bank. You do have your normal rank structure, LEO, CPL, SGT, SSGT, LT, Chief, and the Law Enforcement manager who is typically a banker. And the law enforcement unit is just another of the depts he or she is responsible for inside of the bank.

The Federal Reserve Police is fairly new, prior to 9-11 they were security gaurds but provisions in the Patriot Act gave them the authority to enforce violations of Federal law on Bank property and at the end of your shift you're pretty much considered a civillian again. Pretty much after 9-11 the Gov't saw that the Fed is a possible target so they said to each of the 12 districts hey we are giving you guys law enforcemnet authority you, fund it , and run it the way you want its your baby.

As I said earlier its a good retirement gig, they pay is very good for the amount of work you do, 13% shift differential for swing and night shifts, tuition reimbursement. But if you want to do traditonal police work and some high speed action its not the place.

FEDRC
02-08-2011, 09:12 PM
Yeah there is nothing Federal about the Federal Reserve police and bank, it's funny but a lot of people don't know this. These are the people who run our country and are f€£¥ing it up! I have met some od there agents most are ex usss agents. It seems to be a great gig

xbull
02-08-2011, 09:20 PM
Yeah there is nothing Federal about the Federal Reserve police and bank, it's funny but a lot of people don't know this. These are the people who run our country and are f€£¥ing it up! I have met some od there agents most are ex usss agents. It seems to be a great gig

Now if you work for the Board Of Governers up in D.C , thats where the Chairman, Ben Bernake works that's Federal.

Bearcat357
02-08-2011, 09:37 PM
Depends on the District you're working in. If it is bank policy not to carry off duty you're not. At most of the districts you turn in your weapon at the end of the shift, and you are considered off duty. The Federal Reserve is a completly different animal all together.

Even with the new Federal Law in place....??? Wow....

xbull
02-08-2011, 11:12 PM
Even with the new Federal Law in place....??? Wow....

Yeah, it is crazy. It was very frustrating for me to work there, even though I enjoyed the people I worked with, but if you want something more it was not the place. We had to turn in our weapons at the armory at the end of shift and could not wear our uniforms home. As far as the Fed law goes , as I said in my previous post the Patriot Act gave the Fed the authority to give its protection officer Law enforcement authority, and pretty much handed over the responsiblities to the Districts to run the respective Law Enforcement Units. When I left they were trying to go "Functional" in other words trying to have a standardized way of doing things across the district, but in my opinion it was still messes up because operations in Miami are Different from those in Jacksonvile.

I worked there for about 5 yrs , it wasnt bad for the work we did, however, it was'nt for me. So when I got the call to go the academy, I got my final offer on a friday, I turned in my resignation on Monday, and was gone on Tuesday.

Bearcat357
02-08-2011, 11:48 PM
We had to turn in our weapons at the armory


That I wouldn't mind because I think the VA does the same thing.....BUT....the VA allows folks to carry off-duty.

I know 4-5 guys back home (KC) that were Part-Time Officers in small towns outside KC but worked for the Fed Reserve a while back. They carried the Local Commission so they could carry off-duty. I haven't talked to them since the new bill got passed... Wonder what they are doing....

Interesting.....

Mr. Green
02-09-2011, 04:31 AM
They are hiring a Criminal Investigator right now. Not sure if it is a federal 1811 type position or not but here is the link.

http://www.federalreserve.gov/careers/jobsearch/default.aspx

DDixon1000
02-09-2011, 04:36 PM
Just curious with them being in the situation they are in do they pay decent?, are there step increases and so on?

xbull
02-09-2011, 05:04 PM
Just curious with them being in the situation they are in do they pay decent?, are there step increases and so on?

For what you do the pay is pretty decent. You get a 13% shift differential for swing and night shift, they are pretty much doing away with overtime, of course that's just about everywhere. The FED does not have step increases but they have some something called MBZ or Market Based Zone in which they do a survey to see what the other agencies pay in the area and see if they are comparable and will try to bring it up to par. You will get you cost of living increases every year i forget what the % was and they do offer cash awards at the end of the year for being a top performer like getting the "TOP COP" award or if you are on the pistol team and win the shooting competion.
The TSP and PCO retirement programs are top notch.

When Katrina hit a cople of us went down to the to New Orleans to support the FED down there, I think they gave us $350.00 cash award for going down there. When I started with the FEd in 2005 I was making about 28k when I left in 2010 I was at about 45k. I took about a 3k hit coming over with my new agency , but I'll more than double that salary in a few years.

But you are right the FED is in trouble right now, the nature of banking is starting to change, the FED has let go entire depts because of the economy and technology. As I stated earler FRLEO's main duty is the protection of bank property and its assets. If there are no people or assets to protect........:-{

xbull
02-09-2011, 05:10 PM
That I wouldn't mind because I think the VA does the same thing.....BUT....the VA allows folks to carry off-duty.

I know 4-5 guys back home (KC) that were Part-Time Officers in small towns outside KC but worked for the Fed Reserve a while back. They carried the Local Commission so they could carry off-duty. I haven't talked to them since the new bill got passed... Wonder what they are doing....

Interesting.....

Yeah Bearcat,
Like I said it depends on the District, some are more progressive than others. The NYC FED is cross designated also, but for the most part at the end of shift you got to hang it up. It's a pretty good gig and good money for the amount of work you do. But the thing about it , it is still a bank and the corporate mindset reins supreme. And I'm sure you know that The LE mindset and Corporate mindset don't mix to well.

Fuerza
02-21-2011, 10:41 AM
Yeah Bearcat,
Like I said it depends on the District, some are more progressive than others. The NYC FED is cross designated also, but for the most part at the end of shift you got to hang it up. It's a pretty good gig and good money for the amount of work you do. But the thing about it , it is still a bank and the corporate mindset reins supreme. And I'm sure you know that The LE mindset and Corporate mindset don't mix to well.

There's no such thing as cross-designation in NY. Federal Reserve LEO's are however granted some very limited authority under NYS law to make arrests for state offenses. From what I've seen, officers at the NY Fed tend to have pretty high morale compared to other branches as they usually get the respect of other agencies. With the plethora of obscure law enforcement agencies in NYC, and NYS in general, they're just considered another member of the team.

Ryobi
04-08-2011, 01:48 PM
Weapons get locked in the armory, but carry off duty is sanctioned. They were already legal to carry off duty, but, the southeast Fed district at the least, actually has a policy making it clear their police are authorized to carry off duty.


Yeah, it is crazy. It was very frustrating for me to work there, even though I enjoyed the people I worked with, but if you want something more it was not the place. We had to turn in our weapons at the armory at the end of shift and could not wear our uniforms home. As far as the Fed law goes , as I said in my previous post the Patriot Act gave the Fed the authority to give its protection officer Law enforcement authority, and pretty much handed over the responsiblities to the Districts to run the respective Law Enforcement Units. When I left they were trying to go "Functional" in other words trying to have a standardized way of doing things across the district, but in my opinion it was still messes up because operations in Miami are Different from those in Jacksonvile.

I worked there for about 5 yrs , it wasnt bad for the work we did, however, it was'nt for me. So when I got the call to go the academy, I got my final offer on a friday, I turned in my resignation on Monday, and was gone on Tuesday.

Jim1648
05-19-2011, 01:10 PM
I did apply for the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis opening. I will just have to wait and see what happens.

Law Enforcement Officer I/II-222252
Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
Primary Location MN-Minneapolis
Full-time / Part-time Full-time
Employee Status Regular
Overtime Status Non-exempt
Job Type Experienced
Travel No
Shift Variable
Posting Date May 11, 2011-Ongoing

Description
The Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis Law Enforcement Division safeguards employees, visitors and assets of the Bank. The officers are professional, courteous and conduct themselves with high integrity and the division is looking for a Law Enforcement Officer to join their team.

The individual in this position will perform full law enforcement duties pursuant to Section 11 (q) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 248) (q). Through rotating post assignments, foot, and mobile patrols is responsible for the protection of personnel, facilities, assets, and property within the area under the control and jurisdiction of the Bank. Closely inspects credentials and identification of employees and visitors and ensures that only authorized personnel and vehicles are permitted access to the facility. Uses electronic metal detectors, and x-ray machines and other equipment to assist in the physical search of persons, packages, briefcases, luggage and other deliveries entering the building. Being especially alert for weapons, explosive devices and other prohibited items. Programs and maintains data in the access control system. Enforces federal and state law and the administrative rules and regulations of the Bank. Make apprehensions when required, participates in subsequent court or administrative processes.

Demonstrates a positive attitude and progressive actions through the display of professionalism, courtesy, and appropriate tact and discretion in all interactions with employees and with the public.

Monitors security systems and devices to detect the planning or preparation of acts that may threaten the safety or security of the Bank, its contents, or employees or visitors and their personal property.

Responds to emergency and non-emergency calls for service by contacting complainants, victims, and suspects. Conducts preliminary investigations and takes initial report/complaint. Prepares and submits required reports consistent with Division policy. Maintains detailed and accurate records for files, follow-up investigations, and court purposes. Takes command at crime scenes or accidents and administers first aid as necessary.

Remains compliant with all FRS and Bank training requirements.
Qualifications
Associates Degree in Criminal Justice or related field or an equivalent combination of education and experience.

1 year of military, law enforcement, armed security experience, or a combination there of (3 years of relevant experience to include 1 year of experience as a fulltime sworn Law Enforcement Officer or equivalent grade/rank and significant comprehension of essential job functions for a level II). If a Veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces, must provide a DD-214.

Must be 21 years of age or older.

Must be willing to travel to an out-of-state location to participate in an FRS 8-week training academy.

Must satisfactorily complete a pre-employment medical evaluation, drug test, and psychological evaluation after a conditional offer of employment is made.

Effective interpersonal and communication skills.

Must be able to lift, carry or drag up to 150 pounds.

Must have and maintain a valid driver's license and have an acceptable driving record.

Vision must be at or correctable to 20/20.

Market pay ranges
Level I: $31,700 - $47,500
Level II: $39,000 - $58,400

Deadline date: May 18, 2011

Law Enforcement Officer I/II

Ryobi
07-12-2011, 12:21 PM
Good luck. Every district is different. Some have explicit off-duty carry policies (condoning), others do not. Either way you're legal, but your agency (district office, anyway) may not back you if you're not in one of the fully evolved geographic areas.
I did apply for the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis opening. I will just have to wait and see what happens.

Law Enforcement Officer I/II-222252
Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
Primary Location MN-Minneapolis
Full-time / Part-time Full-time
Employee Status Regular
Overtime Status Non-exempt
Job Type Experienced
Travel No
Shift Variable
Posting Date May 11, 2011-Ongoing

Description
The Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis Law Enforcement Division safeguards employees, visitors and assets of the Bank. The officers are professional, courteous and conduct themselves with high integrity and the division is looking for a Law Enforcement Officer to join their team.

The individual in this position will perform full law enforcement duties pursuant to Section 11 (q) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 248) (q). Through rotating post assignments, foot, and mobile patrols is responsible for the protection of personnel, facilities, assets, and property within the area under the control and jurisdiction of the Bank. Closely inspects credentials and identification of employees and visitors and ensures that only authorized personnel and vehicles are permitted access to the facility. Uses electronic metal detectors, and x-ray machines and other equipment to assist in the physical search of persons, packages, briefcases, luggage and other deliveries entering the building. Being especially alert for weapons, explosive devices and other prohibited items. Programs and maintains data in the access control system. Enforces federal and state law and the administrative rules and regulations of the Bank. Make apprehensions when required, participates in subsequent court or administrative processes.

Demonstrates a positive attitude and progressive actions through the display of professionalism, courtesy, and appropriate tact and discretion in all interactions with employees and with the public.

Monitors security systems and devices to detect the planning or preparation of acts that may threaten the safety or security of the Bank, its contents, or employees or visitors and their personal property.

Responds to emergency and non-emergency calls for service by contacting complainants, victims, and suspects. Conducts preliminary investigations and takes initial report/complaint. Prepares and submits required reports consistent with Division policy. Maintains detailed and accurate records for files, follow-up investigations, and court purposes. Takes command at crime scenes or accidents and administers first aid as necessary.

Remains compliant with all FRS and Bank training requirements.
Qualifications
Associates Degree in Criminal Justice or related field or an equivalent combination of education and experience.

1 year of military, law enforcement, armed security experience, or a combination there of (3 years of relevant experience to include 1 year of experience as a fulltime sworn Law Enforcement Officer or equivalent grade/rank and significant comprehension of essential job functions for a level II). If a Veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces, must provide a DD-214.

Must be 21 years of age or older.

Must be willing to travel to an out-of-state location to participate in an FRS 8-week training academy.

Must satisfactorily complete a pre-employment medical evaluation, drug test, and psychological evaluation after a conditional offer of employment is made.

Effective interpersonal and communication skills.

Must be able to lift, carry or drag up to 150 pounds.

Must have and maintain a valid driver's license and have an acceptable driving record.

Vision must be at or correctable to 20/20.

Market pay ranges
Level I: $31,700 - $47,500
Level II: $39,000 - $58,400

Deadline date: May 18, 2011

Law Enforcement Officer I/II

tanksoldier
07-12-2011, 02:57 PM
Either way you're legal,

If you're covered by law by not by corporate policy, you have to decide which is more important: Your life or your job.

Jim1648
07-30-2011, 07:35 PM
Does anybody happen to know if there are Canine Officers at all United States Federal Reserve Police sites or are they only at certain locations?

xbull
07-31-2011, 08:50 AM
Does anybody happen to know if there are Canine Officers at all United States Federal Reserve Police sites or are they only at certain locations?

I don't know about all the districts , but we had two dogs at the branch I worked. However, the dogs were not patrol trained.

CombatCoastie
08-06-2011, 09:48 AM
I'd like to clarify a few things because this seems to be a much debated topic among forum members. Federal Reserve Police officers, prior to 9/11, were mostly state certified private or company police officers. Every branch had a different uniform, a different patch, badge, sidearm, and policies. Post 9/11, giant steps have been made to standardize the operations of the department. Now, same uniforms, same patches, same badges, but still different sidearms among certain branches (most use the Glock 22.) All FRLEO's carry a federal law enforcement commission. This commission is granted after completion of a FLETA accredited basic training program. This program is standard across the country with the exception of the Board of Governors in DC. The folks in NY also usually attend a 2 or 3 week additional training program that gives them certain state authority as they drive patrol cars and have responsibility for a campus that spans several blocks. An FRLEO's authority generally allows them to make arrests for federal felonies and misdemeanors committed on bank property while the officer is on duty. An officer is also permitted to make arrests if they have probable cause that a felony was committed on bank property whether it was in the officer's presence or not. An officer is also able to arrest a subject who has a confirmed warrant with another LE agency provided that the issuing agency is willing to pick up the subject. The federal authority granted to FRLEO's was done to accomodate the varying working conditions that they face. An FRLEO's authority extends to any place in the country where the FRLEO is conducting official business. The jurisdiction is not restricted to a location, a building, a state, etc. The jurisdiction extends to where ever they are on duty. FRLEO's are also permitted to fly armed if on official business (protection details, etc.)

CombatCoastie
08-06-2011, 10:33 AM
Some additional information forum members may find interesting: certain branches have tactical teams, K9 units, hazmat units, and bomb detection units. The academy instructors are FLETC, FBI, NRA, or otherwise certified by an accredited and nationally recognized organization. It is true, FRLEO's have absolutely no off-duty authority. FRLEO's are required to leave their issued weapons at the bank when leaving for the day. Some branches also require officers to leave uniforms at the bank at the end of the day. Most, however, do not restrict the wearing of uniforms to or from work. HR218 was recently updated to specifically include FRLEO's which puts to rest the issue of whether they are or are not federal law enforcement. They are permitted by federal law to carry their personal weapons off duty whether they have a CCW or not. An individual branch may restrict an officer's ability to do so, just like a municipal police department could restrict its' officer's off duty carry, but they would not be violating any laws by carrying a weapon off duty without a CCW.

It is what it is. During the hiring process, every effort is made to inform candidates of what the job is and is not. Disillusioned young cowboys/girls often don't make the cut or only last a few months before becoming bored and desiring something more. But this job is no different than most other alphabet soup federal police departments (with the exception that they are not exactly "federal"). The US Mint Police, Pentagon Police, Bureau of Engraving and Printing Police (bet you didn't even know they existed), FBI Police, DoD Police, etc. etc. etc. all basically focus on proactive physical security: post standing, people screening, package/vehicle screening, access control, mobile/foot patrol, alarm monitoring, emergency response and disaster preparedness. The fact that the US financial center is on the top of the terrorist target lists makes this job even more critical.

I remember reading a previous thread about this same topic where the OP was adament that FRLEO's were not "real police" because they usually didn't make arrests. The OP was continuously asking "how many arrests have you made?" Since when was the "realness" of a police officer measured by the number of arrests he/she made? The OP came across as arrogant, naive, and immature. How many arrests has the FBI Police made this year? The US Printing Office Police? The Smithsonian Police? Exactly.

I hope this was somewhat enlightening.

Jim1648
08-06-2011, 11:00 AM
CombatCoastie, thank you very much for posting that. It was very enlightening. I know for me at least I am really not all that concerned with off-duty arrest authority. When I look back during my career prior to retirement, there were a few things that I got involved with off-duty, but what seemed to work best was to call the folks on duty to deal with it. Hey, if I am off-duty why would I want to go back to work on a day off.

As far as number of arrests, I worked in the warrant unit for several years and pretty much got that out of my system. Yes, I enjoyed the heck out of fugitive work, but it is just another different type of police work. I can think of a number of sworn officers in various agencies that haven't made an arrest in years. The nature of their assignment isn't such that they are chasing radio calls, etc.

Another thing the younger guys/gals love is running hot to calls. Again, I have been there, done that, and probably glad I didn't kill myself a few times. I did find that the older I got the less likely I was to risk my neck on most calls. Unfortunately, I have known people that have killed themselves on duty running hot to a call. Then they get whacked by another car and it is "game over".

As far as leaving the gun at work. At least from my perspective, who cares. Needless to say, I have carried a Glock Model 22 a whole bunch of years already. If I want to carry a sidearm on the way home, then I can buy my own Glock Model 22 (or maybe a 23 or 27).

I have quite a bit of emergency management training. It sounds like the Federal Reserve might look favorably upon that. But I think the message comes through load and clear. If you are 20 something fresh out of police training, hoping to drive fast and arrest a bunch of people with guns, dope, etc. this isn't a good fit. On the other hand, if you want a nice slot with a steady paycheck, this is an excellent place.

DDixon1000
08-07-2011, 02:34 AM
FRLEO's are part of a private organization. The Federal Reserve is not part of the U.S. government and benefits and pay are set by the Federal Reserve not the U.S. Government. It is a quasi-federal position as they do have accredited training but are not Federal Law Enforcement. Their accredited training came out of 9/11 as an attempt to protect the infrastructure of the Reserve. They are far more similar to Amtrak Police than they are FBI Police as FBI Police are Federal Law Enforcement Officers for a Federal Agency. Not saying they aren't LEO's but they aren't with a federal agency.

CombatCoastie
08-07-2011, 09:20 AM
FRLEO's are part of a private organization. The Federal Reserve is not part of the U.S. government and benefits and pay are set by the Federal Reserve not the U.S. Government. It is a quasi-federal position as they do have accredited training but are not Federal Law Enforcement. Their accredited training came out of 9/11 as an attempt to protect the infrastructure of the Reserve. They are far more similar to Amtrak Police than they are FBI Police as FBI Police are Federal Law Enforcement Officers for a Federal Agency. Not saying they aren't LEO's but they aren't with a federal agency.

I'm sorry but you are wrong. They may not work for a federal agency (however the gents at the Board of Governors are 0083's) but they are in fact federal law enforcement officers. To argue this point is pointless. In order to be a sworn LEO (which they are), they must carry some sort of commission. That commission must either be state or federal. Since the training they receive is FLETA accredited, that would make the commission federal- thus making them federal law enforcement officers. The daily tasks and job functions may not lead you to draw this conclusion but it is true. You do not need to work for a federal agency to be a federal law enforcement officer. The credentials say "is a duly sworn federal law enforcement officer." It is an obscure and unique phenomena in law enforcement but like it or not, they are federal law enforcement officers. The training is specifically designed to comply with FLETC standards to commission them as federal law enofrcement. And, seeing as though they are covered by HR218 (LEOSA), threy must mean they are federal LE's. I only know of two types of law enforcement commissions: state and federal. Private police, city, municipal, county, and state police/sheriff/constables all receive state certified commissions. All other law enforcement officers receive federal commissions (with the exception of military police). Fed officers don't get state commissions- but rather federal commissions- then how is it still possible that someone can argue this point? It is clear as day, black and white, on paper in many different places.

CombatCoastie
08-07-2011, 09:32 AM
Here's a way to make this more simple: if fed officers are endowed with the authority to enforce federal laws- and are specifically trained to step back in state or local offenses and contact the local authorities, then what type of LEO does this make them? Dixon, youv'e stated that they are LEO's, but what type of LEO are they? They must either be private (company) police and thereby state certified, or they must be federal. Unless there is some other type of LEO out there that I am unaware of.

DDixon1000
08-07-2011, 01:01 PM
I understand what you are trying to say coastie but there are agencies like the the Reserve that are quasi-federal such as Amtrak. They are private organizations (not federal) that are considered so vital that after 9/11 the government ordered they have standardized training in line with federal agencies to be able to protect Americas infrastructure. Prior to this order the training was in house and some branches did not carry firearms. To be able to understand the Reserve you have to first understand it is not part of the Federal Government. The Reserve is a private banking organization and it's Board of Governors were given express permission to create their own police force through their Board of Governors Federal Reserve Act. Federal Reserve Police are not funded by congress and are not part of a federal agency. They do not get the same benefits as those from agencies funded by congress such the FBI, DEA, and so on. Working for the Federal Reserve you are not in any way an employee of the Federal Government and you receive no status as a Federal Government employee. This is what I mean when I say they are not Federal LEO's. Working for the Fed will not allow you to apply to other Federal jobs as a status candidate because you are not a Fed. This is why this is not clear cut and as easy to see as you have stated.

As far as LEOSA FRLEO's and Amtrak police (quasi federal) were added as a special provision in 2010. They were added as a special provison because they were not covered under the defintion of Federal Law Enforcement Officer and couldn't be added later such as the BOP because they weren't a federal agency. In other words to qualify congress had to specifically add them and the Amtrak Police to the act because they were quasi federal. The act specifically states as you said State, Federal and then Amtrak and FRLEO's under their special provisions. Because FRLEO's are not part of the Federal Government they had to be added under their own language. So, to answer your question no you do not have to be State or Federal to carry under LEOSA you can be State, Federal, Amtrak, retired, or FRLEO as they have their own special language in the bill as both are private organizations.

CombatCoastie
08-07-2011, 01:21 PM
I am not debating at all whether or not they work for the federal government. I am a fed officer and I am extremely familiar with who I work for and the history, politics, and legalities behind the federal reserve. The point I am trying to make is that you do not need to work for a federal agency to be considered and recognized as a federal law enforcement officer. I think this boils down to semantics. The federal reserve police officers that work in DC for the board of governors are most definitely federal employees working for a federal agency (they are 0083 federal employees). Their commission is EXACTLY the same as those granted to the officers working at the "quasi-governmental" branches. Their training is EXACTLY the same. Their responsibilities and authority (with the exception of site-specific differences) are exactly the same. The only difference is who signs their paychecks. The written documentation and bonafide commission specifically states "duly sworn federal law enforcement officer." Are the credentials false? Was there a misprint or typo of some sort? I'm not trying to be indignant or make this position out to be something that it isn't, but I continuously get frustrated with those who try and detract from another's position. Again- there are two types of commissions: state and federal. If your commission is federal- and you are charged with enforcing federal laws- then, by definition, you are a federal law enforcement officer.

DDixon1000
08-07-2011, 08:08 PM
I am not debating at all whether or not they work for the federal government. I am a fed officer and I am extremely familiar with who I work for and the history, politics, and legalities behind the federal reserve. The point I am trying to make is that you do not need to work for a federal agency to be considered and recognized as a federal law enforcement officer. I think this boils down to semantics. The federal reserve police officers that work in DC for the board of governors are most definitely federal employees working for a federal agency (they are 0083 federal employees). Their commission is EXACTLY the same as those granted to the officers working at the "quasi-governmental" branches. Their training is EXACTLY the same. Their responsibilities and authority (with the exception of site-specific differences) are exactly the same. The only difference is who signs their paychecks. The written documentation and bonafide commission specifically states "duly sworn federal law enforcement officer." Are the credentials false? Was there a misprint or typo of some sort? I'm not trying to be indignant or make this position out to be something that it isn't, but I continuously get frustrated with those who try and detract from another's position. Again- there are two types of commissions: state and federal. If your commission is federal- and you are charged with enforcing federal laws- then, by definition, you are a federal law enforcement officer.

Sounds like you got it all figured out I wonder why they aren't 0083's? Then again I wonder why they had to be specially included in LEOSA since they are "Federal Law Enforcement"? Also the board of governors is appointed by the President that is why they are guarded by 0083's. The board of governors is completely seperate from the organization itself which is private. It's not about taking anything away from anyone Coastie, it's about representing the truth about a position. You have many people on here considering a career in Federal Law Enforcement and as a Former Federal Law Enforcement Officer I would hate to see anyone thinking they are getting a foot in the Federal door as FRLEO when in reality they aren't. There is a big difference between being a Federal Law Enforcement Officer with a Federal agency that is gaining status than working for a private organization where no status is gained. Anyway, good luck in your future endevours!

CombatCoastie
08-07-2011, 08:35 PM
You are simply misguided in your belief that, in order to be considered a federal law enforcement officer, you must work for a federal agency. It's simply not the case plain and simple. No, you're not gaining status by working for us. No, your training will not carry over to another agency. But if you attended FLETC to work for the US Mint Police, or the FBI Police (and I am not saying we are the same as them), the US Marshals would still require you to attend their academy. I do think that, being a former federal law enforcement officer yourself, it bothers you that there is an agency out there that simply because of its function within the infrastructure of the United States, is not a government agency but does have the power to designate men and women as federal law enforcement officers. Yes I do have it figured out Dixon. It would be irresponsible of me to NOT have it figured out before I began employment with them. I know who I work for. I know what my commission says and what is printed on my credentials. We spent 60 hours during initial training covering this very topic. We were spoken to by lawyers from both the Fed and FLETC's legal training division.

But to appease you... DISCLAIMER!!!: To all who shall see this notice be warned- working for the Law Enforcement Unit of ANY Federal Reserve Bank will probably not help you in your endeavours into the world of what some might consider "actual" federal law enforcement. It might look good on a resume, but that's about it.

CombatCoastie
08-08-2011, 10:10 AM
Also- Dixon mentioned LEOSA (HR218) and how FRLEO's had to be specifically added because they were not originally considered federal law enforcement. This is exactly correct. Prior to the patriot act, FRLEO's were state commissioned private or special police officers. After the patriot act, when FRLEO's were given federal LEO status, FRLEO's were added in as an addition rather than re-writing the entire LEOSA (like amendments to the constitution). And yes, the individual branches are separate from the board of governors- however all of our authority and the ability of branch presidents to hire, train, and commission law enforcement officers is given to them by the BOG. The BOG does our general oversight and establishes our policies, procedures, and authority.

Phreaxer
08-09-2011, 10:14 AM
You know you are hoping to get a USSS job when:
You pull into your office at work and get excited when you see a Crown Vic with a "G" plate on it. lol

AdamD912
09-12-2012, 09:50 PM
Hello to all. I recently applied to the Chicago branch. I was hoping to get input as to if this is one of the branches that is considered to have hight morale that was talked about in some of the other posts? Also, what is the pay guidlines for this branch. Are they similar to the Market Pay that was already posted for the location in Minnnesota (if I am not mistaken?) I attempted to call them them in reference to their pay, and they would not give it. I am currently a local P/O. I would like to know if this branch discourages off duty P/O employment or would they be ok with something like that. ( I am talking maybe two days a week 8 hours shifts, already have a place in mind.) I see that some of the other branches are ok with being a local officer along with working for the bank assigned to. I know this is an older posting, but any and all input would be helpful if someone works at the Chicago Federal Reserved Bank as an LEO or has additional useful information for me on this location it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

HollywoodJayy
09-13-2012, 12:18 AM
Yeah, it is crazy. It was very frustrating for me to work there, even though I enjoyed the people I worked with, but if you want something more it was not the place. We had to turn in our weapons at the armory at the end of shift and could not wear our uniforms home. As far as the Fed law goes , as I said in my previous post the Patriot Act gave the Fed the authority to give its protection officer Law enforcement authority, and pretty much handed over the responsiblities to the Districts to run the respective Law Enforcement Units. When I left they were trying to go "Functional" in other words trying to have a standardized way of doing things across the district, but in my opinion it was still messes up because operations in Miami are Different from those in Jacksonvile.

I worked there for about 5 yrs , it wasnt bad for the work we did, however, it was'nt for me. So when I got the call to go the academy, I got my final offer on a friday, I turned in my resignation on Monday, and was gone on Tuesday.

You ever consider dishing out an entire $80 for a CCW permit?

HollywoodJayy
09-13-2012, 12:23 AM
The individual in this position will perform full law enforcement duties pursuant to Section 11 (q) of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 248) (q). Through rotating post assignments, foot, and mobile patrols is responsible for the protection of personnel, facilities, assets, and property within the area under the control and jurisdiction of the Bank. Closely inspects credentials and identification of employees and visitors and ensures that only authorized personnel and vehicles are permitted access to the facility. Uses electronic metal detectors, and x-ray machines and other equipment to assist in the physical search of persons, packages, briefcases, luggage and other deliveries entering the building. Being especially alert for weapons, explosive devices and other prohibited items. Programs and maintains data in the access control system. Enforces federal and state law and the administrative rules and regulations of the Bank. Make apprehensions when required, participates in subsequent court or administrative processes.

This was pretty much exactly the same job description back in my college/security guard days....just sayin'

xbull
09-16-2012, 10:17 AM
You ever consider dishing out an entire $80 for a CCW permit?

It doesn't matter now I'm with another Law Enforcement Agency!

Agent555
09-16-2012, 04:06 PM
Probably didn't notice that your post was a year and a half old.

AdamD912
10-01-2012, 04:17 PM
Does anyone know anything about pay as far as the chicago branch is concerned. I was hoping to find out. I might try out there. How are they about secondary part time police employment?? Was thinking about that too??

orlandofed5-0
10-01-2012, 05:08 PM
Does anyone know anything about pay as far as the chicago branch is concerned. I was hoping to find out. I might try out there. How are they about secondary part time police employment?? Was thinking about that too??

35k.. Your off duty employment cant be with a bank or somehow deal with money.

As far as being a federal officer, FRB assigned to the 12 districts are not federal officers. They are quasi federal officers (same as Amtrak police). I work across the street from the Philly fed and their officers can not apply to any of our internal announcements unlike other federal employees. Yes they have federal authority pertaining protection of the bank and its employees but they have no authority off the property.

Fedpolice99
10-01-2012, 06:45 PM
What orlandofed5-0 has stated is almost correct. I work in the 12th district, I can't speak for the other eleven districts but in the 12th district we have authority off property.

Now one thing you have to take in to account is each district runs differently from one another in some cases. if you have any question you can PM me I will answer what I can

35k.. Your off duty employment cant be with a bank or somehow deal with money.

As far as being a federal officer, FRB assigned to the 12 districts are not federal officers. They are quasi federal officers (same as Amtrak police). I work across the street from the Philly fed and their officers can not apply to any of our internal announcements unlike other federal employees. Yes they have federal authority pertaining protection of the bank and its employees but they have no authority off the property.

irishlad2nv
10-01-2012, 07:04 PM
Authority where off property?

orlandofed5-0
10-01-2012, 07:20 PM
I work directly across from the Philly fed for an actual Treasury agency. The only time the Philly fed guys go off is to get something to eat or for protection of the bank president. So if you're going off property to make an arrest, I hope you have great insurance because I know if the Philly guys go off the bank wont protect them.

Fedpolice99
10-01-2012, 07:39 PM
It is different in the San Francisco AOR then in the Philly office but hey I just work here whtat do I know

orlandofed5-0
10-01-2012, 07:41 PM
Maybe I will contact my agency's officers in SF and ask them if they know any of your guys and what the policies are...

Fedpolice99
10-01-2012, 07:54 PM
Ok if that make's you feel better go ahead..

orlandofed5-0
10-02-2012, 04:05 PM
Ok if that make's you feel better go ahead..

It wont for me but stopping bs about an agency with zero authority off property will. Unless you can post that agency's policy

Fedpolice99
10-02-2012, 04:32 PM
Some one had some bad cheerios this morning ...lol... But on the policey side I will see what I can do for you sire

sgt jon
10-02-2012, 04:34 PM
Because this discussion got me thinking, I took a look at the horses mouth…



Are Federal Reserve Bank employees considered government employees?

No. Employees of the Federal Reserve Banks are not government employees. They are paid as part of the expenses of their employing Reserve Bank.

Source: http://www.richmondfed.org/faqs/frb/

This is not to denigrate their work or malign them, but at least for those working outside the confines of the Board HQ, it would seem that they are in-fact not federal employees.

And then I dug a bit more and found this:



Uniform Protection Authority for Federal Reserve Facilities

(q)
1. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, to authorize personnel to act as law enforcement officers to protect and safeguard the premises, grounds, property, personnel, including members of the Board, of the Board, or any Federal reserve bank, and operations conducted by or on behalf of the Board or a reserve bank.

2. The Board may, subject to the regulations prescribed under paragraph (5), delegate authority to a Federal reserve bank to authorize personnel to act as law enforcement officers to protect and safeguard the bank's premises, grounds, property, personnel, and operations conducted by or on behalf of the bank.

3. Law enforcement officers designated or authorized by the Board or a reserve bank under paragraph (1) or (2) are authorized while on duty to carry firearms and make arrests without warrants for any offense against the United States committed in their presence, or for any felony cognizable under the laws of the United States committed or being committed within the buildings and grounds of the Board or a reserve bank if they have reasonable grounds to believe that the person to be arrested has committed or is committing such a felony. Such officers shall have access to law enforcement information that may be necessary for the protection of the property or personnel of the Board or a reserve bank.

4. For purposes of this subsection, the term "law enforcement officers" means personnel who have successfully completed law enforcement training and are authorized to carry firearms and make arrests pursuant to this subsection.

5. The law enforcement authorities provided for in this subsection may be exercised only pursuant to regulations prescribed by the Board and approved by the Attorney General.
[12 USC 248(q). As added by act of Oct. 26, 2001 (115 Stat. 333).]



Source: http://www.federalreserve.gov/aboutthefed/section11.htm

irishlad2nv
10-02-2012, 04:36 PM
Does your Fed Reserve share have concurrent jurisdiction with other agencies? If not, how in the hect can or would you be allowed anywhere off property as said...I am just as confused.

Fedpolice99
10-02-2012, 04:39 PM
Besides if you want proof just go on youtube there is plenty of video of our officers in SF out on Market street by the fed working with SFPD to quarrel all the Occupiers.

Just youtube the hell out of it there are plenty of good and not so good footage from SF, and DC

irishlad2nv
10-02-2012, 04:47 PM
Would 101 Market St not be the addres of the SF Fed? I sure hope the employees would be assisting locals, vice versa. Either way, good job avoiding the simple requests that have been made.

orlandofed5-0
10-02-2012, 07:35 PM
My agency and direct from the website


Established in 1792, the United States Mint Police is one of the oldest federal law enforcement agencies in the nation. Responsible for establishing the standard "As secure as Fort Knox," our officers continue to meet that standard everyday. The U.S. Mint Police are responsible for protecting over $100 billion in Treasury and other Government assets stored in facilities located at Philadelphia, PA; San Francisco, CA; West Point, NY; Denver, CO; Fort Knox, KY; and our headquarters in Washington, DC.

Today, U.S. Mint Police Officers have the primary responsibility for protecting life and property, preventing, detecting, and investigating criminal acts, collecting and preserving evidence, making arrests, and enforcing Federal and local laws.

Cooperative agreement with MPDC for our DC facility.

http://mpdc.dc.gov/node/152122


Cooperative Agreement: United States Mint Police and MPDC
A. Definitions
1."Mint" means the United States Mint, a bureau of the United States Department of the Treasury.
2.“Mint Police” means the United States Mint Police.
3."MPD" means Metropolitan Police Department.
4."Jurisdiction" means the area described in Part B1.
B. Jurisdiction*
1.The Mint Police may assist the MPD in carrying out crime prevention and law enforcement activities by sending Mint Police officers on patrol with the power to arrest in the following areas of the District of Columbia that immediately surrounds the area of the Mint Police's geographical jurisdiction, that is—
“The area within and bounded by 12th Street, NW, to the West; New York Avenue to the Northwest; K Street to the North; 7th Street, NW, to the East; and E Street to the South. This Jurisdiction includes the named streets, as well as the adjacent sidewalks on both sides these streets.”
◦See the map of the geographical jurisdiction.
2.The Mint Police may assist the MPD in carrying out crime prevention and law enforcement activities, including exercising the power to arrest, when on-duty Mint Police officers are engaged in official business involving protection in transit of bullion, coins, dies, and other property and assets of, or in the custody of, the Mint, between and among locations within the District of Columbia.
3.The Mint Police may assist the MPD in carrying out crime prevention and law enforcement activities at special events by sending Mint Police officers to such locations within the District of Columbia, and at such times, as the Mint and the MPD agree. Before agreeing to render assistance to the MPD for special events, the Mint ordinarily will require the MPD to agree to reimburse the Mint for its expenses.
4.It remains within the discretion of the Mint whether the Mint Police will assist the MPD in carrying out crime prevention and law enforcement activities by sending Mint Police officers on patrol within the Jurisdiction conferred by this Agreement or to special events. This Agreement shall not be interpreted to require the Mint Police to provide such assistance at a particular time or in a particular manner. The Mint also may decline to conduct crime prevention and law enforcement activities in specific instances and for specific periods of time. Any such declination shall not be construed as an unwillingness to continue the arrangement provided for in this Agreement. Whenever the Mint Police provides assistance pursuant to this Agreement, however, the terms of this Agreement shall apply.

We do not routinely go out and do arrests in other agencies jurisdictions....

sgt jon
10-03-2012, 09:12 AM
Besides if you want proof just go on youtube there is plenty of video of our officers in SF out on Market street by the fed working with SFPD to quarrel all the Occupiers.

Just youtube the hell out of it there are plenty of good and not so good footage from SF, and DC


Since I have been drawn into this topic like a moth to the porch light, I will fire away…

Seeing a video on Youtube does not establish the legality or even the appropriateness of something. I sincerely hope that this is not the source of authoritative guidance….Youtube that is.

While the following could be interpreted to permit “off property” activity:



1. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, to authorize personnel to act as law enforcement officers to protect and safeguard the premises, grounds, property, personnel, including members of the Board, of the Board, or any Federal reserve bank, and operations conducted by or on behalf of the Board or a reserve bank.


No federal agency or agent possesses absolute extraterritorial authority. By virtue of the grant of authority in accordance with US Code, enforcement authority is limited to law(s) and location (or jurisdiction in you will). While some agencies possess the authority to enter into agreements with non-federal entities under MOA’s/MOU’s, such must be articulated in the enabling statutes…

xbull
10-03-2012, 11:46 AM
At the Federal Reserve you are pretty much a private employee of the bank. You are charged with protecting the bank and it's assets. You are considered an LEO when you are on duty only, there are 12 districts and district is ran differenly some are more pro-law enforcement than others but for the most part the work you do is security based. Static posts, xray machines, building tours and walking the perimeter.
Your Law Enforcement manager is a banker.

orlandofed5-0
10-03-2012, 03:13 PM
At the Federal Reserve you are pretty much a private employee of the bank. You are charged with protecting the bank and it's assets. You are considered an LEO when you are on duty only, there are 12 districts and district is ran differenly some are more pro-law enforcement than others but for the most part the work you do is security based. Static posts, xray machines, building tours and walking the perimeter.
Your Law Enforcement manager is a banker.

I know you and I have gone back and forth.. Here at the Philly fed they only do protection of the bank president and that is the only time they have authority off the property.. Can you please show where in anyother instance that FRB (not BoG) branches have off property authority to make arrests?

Coppiper
11-03-2012, 03:09 PM
Hi Jim,

I applied there as well a few months ago and was wondering if you heard anything. I hear it is a pretty well kept secret for retired folks. I hope everything worked out well for you, best of luck sir.

Coppiper
11-03-2012, 03:28 PM
The NY Fed LEO's are cross designated as NYS Peace Officers under the Municipal Police Training Council. I was assigned to the 1st Precinct (covers the FED) in lower MN and those guys were mostly retired NYPD. I spoke to many of them while on a fixer near their bank and they told me they were cross designated as Peace Officers and have authority off their property. Now, having said that, they also said they very rarely do anything off property and let the precinct guys fight crime, lol. I agree with them, they did their 20 (or more in many cases) and now want an easier job that pays well, won't get them shot and fills their day. As to your question about arrests off property, as a NYS Peace Officer, they may arrest with probable cause for a felony in or out of their presence and a misdemeanor they witness. They do not have the exception to the misdemeanor rule the NYPD has, or at least they did not a few years ago when I spoke to them. I hope this helps clear some things up. I still know 1 guy working there and can reach out if it helps make things a bit more clear. Good luck all, sit back and let 'em kill each other!


I know you and I have gone back and forth.. Here at the Philly fed they only do protection of the bank president and that is the only time they have authority off the property.. Can you please show where in anyother instance that FRB (not BoG) branches have off property authority to make arrests?

NYCTNT
11-03-2012, 07:28 PM
Peace officers arrest upon probable cause. That was for off duty situations you noted.

There are not much retirees there. Mostly and that's 90% are young bucks waiting on the nypd list.